ShareThis Page
Pirates

Pirates on 99-year-old usher Phil Coyne: 'Legends never really retire'

Chris Adamski
| Friday, April 6, 2018, 4:24 p.m.
Phil Coyne, 95, usher at PNC Park talks about his years ushering for the Pirates on Wednesday, Sept. 25, 2013. When he started working for the Pirates in 1936, a gallon of gasoline cost 19 cents.
Phil Coyne, 95, usher at PNC Park talks about his years ushering for the Pirates on Wednesday, Sept. 25, 2013. When he started working for the Pirates in 1936, a gallon of gasoline cost 19 cents.
PNC Park usher Phil Coyne, who has worked at Pirates games for over 80 years, will celebrate his 99th birthday on Thursday. The Pirates honored Coyne with a jersep presentation before a game against the Cubs Wednesday, April 26, 2017, at PNC Park.
Christopher Horner | Tribune-Review
PNC Park usher Phil Coyne, who has worked at Pirates games for over 80 years, will celebrate his 99th birthday on Thursday. The Pirates honored Coyne with a jersep presentation before a game against the Cubs Wednesday, April 26, 2017, at PNC Park.
PNC Park usher Phil Coyne, who has worked at Pirates games for over 80 years, will celebrate his 99th birthday on Thursday. The Pirates honored Coyne with a jersey presentation by president Frank Coonelly before a game against the Cubs Wednesday, April 26, 2017, at PNC Park.
Christopher Horner | Tribune-Review
PNC Park usher Phil Coyne, who has worked at Pirates games for over 80 years, will celebrate his 99th birthday on Thursday. The Pirates honored Coyne with a jersey presentation by president Frank Coonelly before a game against the Cubs Wednesday, April 26, 2017, at PNC Park.
Phil Coyne, 99, an usher at Pittsburgh Pirates games for 81 years, holds packages of Oreo cookies from a gift bag that Pirates President Frank Coonelly gave him after Pittsburgh City Council declared Tuesday as 'Phil Coyne Day.' Coyne said he enjoys having two Oreos and a glass of milk each night before going to bed.
Phil Coyne, 99, an usher at Pittsburgh Pirates games for 81 years, holds packages of Oreo cookies from a gift bag that Pirates President Frank Coonelly gave him after Pittsburgh City Council declared Tuesday as 'Phil Coyne Day.' Coyne said he enjoys having two Oreos and a glass of milk each night before going to bed.

The Pirates later this month will honor an usher who worked the team's games for more than eight decades.

Phil Coyne, 99, told The Incline that he's "done" working games at PNC Park because of a recent fall and related balance issues. Coyne worked the past 82 seasons as an usher for the Pirates, starting at age 18 in 1936 at Forbes Field and continuing through Three Rivers Stadium and PNC Park eras.

Through a statement attributed to Pirates president Frank Coonelly, the Pirates said they will honor Coyne with a ceremony before their game against the St. Louis Cardinals on April 27. Coyne told The Incline he would attend that game as a fan with family and friends to celebrate his 100th birthday.

Coonelly's statement, released through a team spokesman: "Legends never really retire. Having worked his first Pirates game at the age of 18 in 1936, Phil remains number one on our organizational seniority list and will always have a place on our team. If Phil has indeed worked his last Pirates game, he has served our fans with incredible grace and distinction and he certainly has earned the right to watch Pirates games with his feet up from the comfort of his easy chair. We very much look forward to April 27, when Phil and nearly 200 of his family and friends will be our guests as we celebrate Phil's 100th birthday during a special pre-game ceremony."

Chris Adamski is a Tribune-Review staff writer. Reach him at cadamski@tribweb.com or via Twitter @C_AdamskiTrib.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.

click me