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Pirates

Pirates' bats turn chilly in loss to Miami

| Friday, April 13, 2018, 10:33 p.m.
Pirates starting pitcher Chad Kuhl watches from the dugout after working during the third inning of the team's baseball game against the Marlins, Friday, April 13, 2018, in Miami.
Pirates starting pitcher Chad Kuhl watches from the dugout after working during the third inning of the team's baseball game against the Marlins, Friday, April 13, 2018, in Miami.
Pirates starting pitcher Chad Kuhl throws during the first inning of a baseball game against the Miami Marlins, Friday, April 13, 2018, in Miami.
Pirates starting pitcher Chad Kuhl throws during the first inning of a baseball game against the Miami Marlins, Friday, April 13, 2018, in Miami.
The Pirates' Elias Diaz watches his two-run home run during the fifth inning of a baseball game against the Miami Marlins, Friday, April 13, 2018, in Miami.
The Pirates' Elias Diaz watches his two-run home run during the fifth inning of a baseball game against the Miami Marlins, Friday, April 13, 2018, in Miami.

MIAMI — JB Shuck couldn't help but smile when he got to first base with his career-high fourth hit of the game.

Playing in the big leagues for the first time since 2016, Shuck tied a Marlins franchise record for hits in a debut, sparking Miami to a 7-2 win over the Pirates on Friday night.

“It was a good feeling to get back, have some good at-bats, get some hits, and it was just a loosening-up moment,” Shuck said.

Shuck's night started with a triple off the right-field wall. He followed with three singles and scored twice.

“That was nice to get a little shot in the arm from JB there,” Marlins manager Don Mattingly said. “Didn't really expect four, but we liked what we saw in spring training.”

Justin Bour homered and drove in two runs and Miguel Rojas added three hits for the Marlins, who snapped a three-game losing streak.

“Getting a big win like that, that was a pretty good first day,” Shuck said.

Miami posted season highs in runs and in hits with 14.

“I think the offense has been pretty good. We've been putting pretty good at-bats together,” Rojas said.

Dillon Peters (2-1) allowed two runs on four hits in six innings.

Chad Kuhl (1-1) worked five innings and allowed 11 hits and five runs, four of them earned.

“Flares and bloops, balls that were hit hard didn't have the angles, kind of singled to death,” Kuhl said.

The Pirates, who entered leading the NL in batting, slugging and runs scored, were held to five hits.

“We got in offensive counts like we have all season,” manager Clint Hurdle said. “(Peters's) fastball was just beating us, just beating us, just beating us. A lot of balls in the air. Give him credit. We weren't able to sync up and square him up.”

Elias Diaz homered in the fifth, driving in both of the Pirates' runs for a 2-1 lead.

The Marlins scored three runs in bottom half of the fifth on an odd play when Starlin Castro hit a sacrifice fly with the bases loaded. After receiving the throw home, Diaz sailed a throw to second into center field with nobody in the vicinity to track down his mistake. The errant throw allowed two more runs to score.

“When I threw it, I thought, ‘Oh my God,' ” Diaz said.

Lewis Brinson snapped a string of 26 hitless at-bats with a single in the sixth, chasing Kuhl.

Bour's two-run homer to right, his third of the season, extended Miami's lead to 7-2 in the seventh.

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