Share This Page

Pirates rough up Chapman, Reds

| Thursday, June 7, 2012, 10:30 p.m.
The Pirates' Michael McKenry watches his RBI double in the 10th inning against the Reds on Thursday, June 7, 2012, in Cincinnati. The Pirates won, 5-4, in 10 innings. AP
The Pirates' Michael McKenry signals the dugout after hitting a double to drive in a run in the 10th inning against the Reds on Thursday, June 7, 2012, in Cincinnati. AP
Catcher Michael McKenry (right) celebrates with relief pitcher Chris Resop after the Pirates defeated the Reds, 5-4, in 10 inning Thursday, June 7, 2012, in Cincinnati. McKenry drove in the go-ahead run with a double, and Resop had the save. AP
Reds closer Aroldis Chapman walks off the mound in the 10th inning against the Pirates on Thursday, June 7, 2012, in Cincinnati. Chapman took the loss. AP
Pirates second baseman Neil Walker (18) collides with first baseman Casey McGehee (14) as Walker catches a pop fly hit by Cincinnati Reds' Todd Frazier in the eighth inning of a baseball game, Thursday, June 7, 2012 in Cincinnati. Pittsburgh won 5-4 in 10 innings. (AP Photo/Al Behrman)
Cincinnati Reds' Ryan Ludwick rounds the bases after hitting a solo home run in the ninth inning of a baseball game against the Pirates, Thursday, June 7, 2012 in Cincinnati. Pittsburgh won 5-4 in 10 innings. (AP Photo/Al Behrman)
Cincinnati Reds' Jay Bruce (32) rounds the bases after hitting a solo home run off Pirates starting pitcher Kevin Correia (29) in the second inning of a baseball game, Thursday, June 7, 2012, in Cincinnati. (AP Photo/Al Behrman)
Pirates catcher Michael McKenry (55) tags out Cincinnati Reds' Joey Votto (19) at home plate in the first inning of a baseball game, Thursday, June 7, 2012 in Cincinnati. (AP Photo/Al Behrman)
Pirates' Garrett Jones watches his RBI sacrifice fly in the fourth inning of a baseball game against the Cincinnati Reds, Thursday, June 7, 2012 in Cincinnati. (AP Photo/Al Behrman)
Pirates' Neil Walker hits a single to drive in a run in the fourth inning of a baseball game against the Cincinnati Reds, Thursday, June 7, 2012, in Cincinnati. (AP Photo/Al Behrman)
Cincinnati Reds starting pitcher Mike Leake fields a ground ball hit by Pirates' Kevin Correia in the third inning of a baseball game, Thursday, June 7, 2012 in Cincinnati. Leake threw Correia out at first. (AP Photo/Al Behrman)
Pirates starting pitcher Kevin Correia throws to a Cincinnati Reds batter in the second inning of a baseball game, Thursday, June 7, 2012, in Cincinnati. (AP Photo/Al Behrman)

CINCINNATI — No one would have predicted Joel Hanrahan blowing a save, Aroldis Chapman allowing his first earned run of the year against the bottom of the Pirates' lineup and Chris Resop pitching perhaps his best inning of the season in a 5-4 Pirates victory Thursday night.

But those were the highlights of a 10-inning nail-biter between the Pirates and Reds in the series finale at Great American Ball Park as the Pirates won their fourth consecutive series and pulled within two games of the NL Central-leading Reds.

“This is probably as satisfying a win as I've had since I've been here,” Pirates manager Clint Hurdle said. “A couple things happened that hadn't happened before. … There was good stuff all over the joint tonight.”

The Pirates entered the bottom of the ninth leading, 4-3, and their bullpen had been brilliant after Hurdle pulled starter Kevin Correia after three straight singles to start the sixth.

Rookie Jared Hughes got out of a two-on, no-out jam to end the sixth, and Juan Cruz, Tony Watson and Jason Grilli shut down the Reds through the eighth.

Hanrahan had converted his past 10 save opportunities and had blown one save all year when he came in for the ninth. But Ryan Ludwick, who hit two home runs in 38 games last season with the Pirates, blasted his second of the night to tie the score, 4-4.

Hanrahan hadn't allowed a home run to a right-handed batter since Chris Heisey on Aug. 2, 2010.

The Pirates' closer got out of the inning, and the Reds brought in Chapman and his mind-boggling numbers, chief among them: seven hits and no earned runs allowed all year.

Clint Barmes, with his .188 average, hit a ground-rule double to start the 10th. It was the first hit Chapman had given up since May 17. Michael McKenry, who was batting .185 coming into the game, hit another double, and Barmes scored the winning run.

“You have to get up there and prepare for the 100-mph fastball. You can't think about anything else,” McKenry said of facing Chapman. “If you overthink it, he's going to take full advantage of you.”

Chapman's string of appearances without allowing an earned run ended at a franchise-record 24.

Resop, who had one save in his career, came in for the 10th facing Joey Votto, Brandon Phillips and Jay Bruce to start. Votto doubled, but Phillips grounded out. Resop intentionally walked Bruce, and Frazier popped out in foul territory.

That brought up Ludwick, and Resop struck him out for the final out.

“It's what we've done all year — we've battled,” Resop said. “How many one-run games have we played? We don't quit. We never have. … It's how games are won, guys picking each other up. Nobody would have bet that Barmes would have doubled off Chapman followed by a double by McKenry. You couldn't have written that. It was a huge win for us.”

Karen Price is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. She can be reached at kprice@tribweb.com or 412-320-7980.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.