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Verlander sends Tigers back to ALCS

| Friday, Oct. 12, 2012, 1:02 a.m.
Tigers starting pitcher Justin Verlander delivers a pitch in the first inning of Game 5 of an American League Division Series against the Oakland Athletics on Thursday, Oct. 11, 2012. (AP)

OAKLAND, Calif. — Already an ace and MVP, Justin Verlander proved to be the Detroit Tigers' ultimate closer, too.

Verlander struck out 11 in a four-hitter, pitching Detroit into a second straight AL Championship Series a day after Jose Valverde failed to hold a ninth-inning lead with a 6-0 win against the Oakland Athletics in the decisive Game 5 of their division series Thursday night.

Verlander tossed his first career postseason shutout and complete game with a 122-pitch masterpiece.

The Tigers will face the New York Yankees or Baltimore Orioles, who are tied at 2 heading into Game 5 on Friday night in New York. Game 1 of the ALCS is Saturday.

Verlander, the reigning AL Cy Young Award winner and MVP, was so sharp that nobody in the bullpen ever got up to throw. He struck out 22 in his wins on both ends of this nail-biting series. After his team squandered two chances to clinch the series, including blowing a two-run ninth-inning lead in Game 4, manager Jim Leyland left it all up to Verlander — just as he said he would.

Austin Jackson hit an RBI double in the third and a run-scoring single as the Tigers added on in a four-run seventh. Prince Fielder hit an RBI single.

The Tigers are on to another ALCS despite getting just one RBI all series from Triple Crown winner Miguel Cabrera — on a bases-loaded hit by pitch, no less. Booed by the yellow towel-waving sellout crowd of 36,393 each time he stepped into the batter's box. Cabrera finished 5 for 20, and it was his hard-hit ball dropped by Coco Crisp in a 5-4 Game 2 victory Sunday that allowed two runs to score.

Leyland all but called Verlander's latest gem.

The Detroit skipper gave the ball to his 17-game winner and said beforehand the Tigers would likely win or lose with the hard-throwing right-hander on the mound.

And, against the A's, Verlander usually wins.

“I don't have anybody better than him,” Leyland said. “And if they get to him that much we'll probably be in trouble. I'm not taking him out, I can assure you of that, because I don't have anybody better to bring in.”

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