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Grilli blows 1st save; Pirates lose to Reds in 13 innings

| Thursday, June 20, 2013, 12:24 a.m.
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Pirates closer Jason Grilli pitches in the ninth inning against the Reds on Wednesday, June 19, 2013, at Great American Ball Park in Cincinnati. Cincinnati defeated Pittsburgh, 2-1, in 13 innings.
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Pirates catcher Russell Martin tags out the Reds' Zack Cozart at home plate to end the second inning Wednesday, June 19, 2013, in Cincinnati.
Reds catcher Ryan Hanigan (right) watches as the Pirates' Russell Martin spins around after being hit by a pitch from starting pitcher Bronson Arroyo in the fifth inning Wednesday, June 19, 2013, in Cincinnati.
Reds first baseman Joey Votto (19) catches the throw from third baseman Todd Frazier to force out the Pirates' Starling Marte in the fifth inning Wednesday, June 19, 2013, in Cincinnati.
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The Pirates' Starling Marte follows through for a triple in the third inning against the Reds on Wednesday, June 19, 2013, in Cincinnati.
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The Reds' Derrick Robinson is tagged out by the Pirates' Jordy Mercer while trying to steal second base in the third inning Wednesday, June 19, 2013, in Cincinnati.
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The Pirates' Starling Marte slides into third base for a triple in the third inning against the Reds on Thursday, June 19, 2013, in Cincinnati.
Pirates starting pitcher Jeff Locke throws against the Reds in the first inning Wednesday, June 19, 2013, in Cincinnati.
The Pirates' Russell Martin drives in a run in the third inning against the Reds on Wednesday, June 19, 2013, in Cincinnati.
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Pirates catcher Russell Martin takes the throw from left field as the Reds' Zack Cozart races to home plate during the second inning Wednesday, June 19, 2013, in Cincinnati.
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The Reds' Bronson Arroyo pitches in the first inning against the Pirates on Wednesday, June 19, 2013, in Cincinnati.
Pirates relief pitcher Vin Mazzaro (32) walks off the field after giving up the winning run against the Reds in the 13th inning Wednesday, June 19, 2013, in Cincinnati. Cincinnati won, 2-1.
The Reds' Derrick Robinson is safe at first as Pirates first baseman Gaby Sanchez catches the late throw in the 13th inning Wednesday, June 19, 2013, in Cincinnati. Cincinnati won, 2-1.
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The Pirates' Pedro Alvarez walks back to the dugout after striking out to end the 10th inning against the Reds on Wednesday, June 19, 2013.
The Pirates' Jordy Mercer is hit by a pitch from Reds relief pitcher Alfredo Simon in the ninth inning Wednesday, June 19, 2013, in Cincinnati. Cincinnati won, 2-1, in 13 innings.

CINCINNATI — The player most likely to regress on the Pirates' roster entering Wednesday was not starter Jeff Locke, despite cries from the statistical community, but rather closer Jason Grilli.

After all, perfection is a difficult act to sustain.

And regress Grilli did in the ninth inning Wednesday at Great American Ball Park. Jay Bruce sent a Grilli fastball deep into the right field seats to tie the score at 1. It was Grilli's first blown save of the season after he converted his first 25 opportunities. The Reds went on to win, 2-1, thanks to a Brandon Phillips walk-off single in the 13th inning off Vin Mazzaro.

The Pirates entered the day 37-0 when leading after eight innings this season.

“It's hard to be perfect,” Grilli said. “You feel horribly because the 'pen has been working a lot, and I have to make us work even more. To lose a tough ballgame, in an important series. … I can sit here and crucify myself, but everything's been working pretty good for me so I'm not going to sulk tonight.”

Grilli, who had been scored upon just three times in 34 appearances, had little margin for error as the Pirates continued to struggle offensively. They left 14 runners on base.

“We had chances for separation,” Pirates manager Clint Hurdle said.

They left the bases loaded twice, including in the sixth when Locke came to the plate with one out against Reds starter Bronson Arroyo. Locke, who had thrown 81 pitches, grounded out, and Starling Marte also failed to collect a key RBI hit.

While the decision by Hurdle to not pinch hit for Locke can be questioned, it's also understandable why Hurdle stuck with the 25-year-old lefty.

Not only did Hurdle want to save his bullpen, but 72 games into the season, Locke trails only Dodgers ace Clayton Kershaw in the National League with a 2.01 ERA.

“I want (Locke) to pitch after pitching four (relievers) out of the bullpen (Tuesday),” Hurdle said.

Locke's extended sample size of productivity suggests this is no fluke; it's beginning to look a lot like a true breakout.

Locke threw seven scoreless innings against the Reds on Wednesday, allowing four hits. He walked three and struck out three.

Locke said what the skeptics don't see is the change he's made to throwing more two-seam fastballs. That extra movement — combined with Locke's ability to paint both sides of the plate with his fastball — is what has helped him to limit opponents to a .231 batting average in balls in play.

Locke said his “bread-and-butter pitch” is the inside fastball, and given the beanball hostilities between the clubs, it was key for Locke to locate it, which he did Wednesday.

To work out of one of his few jams, Locke froze Todd Frazier with a 91 mph inside fastball in the fourth inning.

“He's getting the ball in to both left- and right-handers,” Hurdle said. “He used his breaking ball well tonight. … The two-seamers had good action. It was another very good outing.”

Locke did not hit a batter, but the Reds hit two more Pirates — Jordy Mercer was hit in the back by a 96 mph Alfredo Simon fastball in the eighth, and Russell Martin was plunked in the back by Bronson Arroyo's 88 mph fastball in the fifth.

In the teams' past nine meetings, 18 batters have been hit: 10 Reds and eight Pirates.

Locke's curveball has added sharpness; his strikeouts have picked up in recent starts, with 31 in his last 36 23 innings.

Locke, who was acquired with Charlie Morton in the 2009 deal that sent Nate McLouth to Atlanta, credits veteran catcher Martin's pitch selection and pitch sequencing for some of his improvement.

For example, most pitchers are careful and tentative when pitching to Reds slugger Joey Votto. But in the sixth inning, Martin had Locke challenge Votto with four straight fastballs located on the middle-inside portion of the strikeout. Votto grounded out to second.

The Pirates' only offense came in the third inning. Marte led off with his second triple of the series. Marte scored when Arroyo failed to field Martin's groundball.

The was all the scoring until Bruce's homer.

The game remained tied until the 13th. Mazzaro allowed an infield hit to Derrick Robinson, and with one out Shin-Soo Choo singled to left, moving Robinson to third.

Mazzaro intentionally walked Votto, and Phillips delivered the game-winning single through the middle of the infield.

Travis Sawchik is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. Reach him at tsawchik@tribweb.com or via Twitter @Sawchik_Trib.

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