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Martin's RBI in eighth gives Pirates 5-4 win over Cards

| Wednesday, July 31, 2013, 10:39 p.m.
Christopher Horner | Tribune-Review
Pirates pitcher Mark Melancon celebrates with catcher Russell Martin after closing out a 5-4 victory over the Cardinals on Wednesday, July 31, 2013, at PNC Park.
Christopher Horner | Tribune-Review
Pirates second baseman Neil Walker rounds the bases past third-base coach Nick Leyva after he homered during the third inning against the Cardinals on Wednesday, July 31, 2013, at PNC Park.
Christopher Horner | Tribune-Review
Pirates second baseman Neil Walker scores during the eighth inning against the Cardinals on Wednesday, July 31, 2013, at PNC Park.
Christopher Horner | Tribune-Review
Pirates second baseman Neil Walker is greeted at the dugout after scoring the winning run during the eighth inning against the Cardinals on Wednesday, July 31, 2013, at PNC Park.
Christopher Horner | Tribune-Review
Pirates left fielder Starling Marte steals second base past the Cardinals' Pete Kozma during the fifth inning Wednesday, July 31, 2013, at PNC Park.
Christopher Horner | Tribune-Review
Pirates third baseman Pedro Alvarez drives in a run during the first inning against the Cardinals on Wednesday, July 31, 2013, at PNC Park.
Christopher Horner | Tribune-Review
Pirates second baseman Neil Walker rounds the bases after homering during the third inning against the Cardinals on Wednesday, July 31, 2013, at PNC Park.
Christopher Horner | Tribune-Review
Pirates left fielder Starling Marte scores past Cardinals catcher Tony Cruz during the fifth inning Wednesday, July 31, 2013, at PNC Park.
Christopher Horner | Tribune-Review
The Cardinals' Carlos Beltran scores past Pirates catcher Russell Martin during the fourth inning Wednesday, July 31, 2013, at PNC Park.
Christopher Horner | Tribune-Review
The Cardinals' Carlos Beltran scores past Pirates catcher Russell Martin during the fourth inning Wednesday, July 31, 2013, at PNC Park.
Christopher Horner | Tribune-Review
Pirates pitcher Jeff Locke delivers during the first inning against the Cardinals on Wednesday, July 31, 2013, at PNC Park.
Christopher Horner | Tribune-Review
The Cardinals' Carlos Beltran scores during the first inning against the Pirates on Wednesday, July 31, 2013, at PNC Park.
Christopher Horner | Tribune-Review
Pirates catcher Russell Martin drives in the winning run during the eighth inning against the Cardinals on Wednesday, July 31, 2013, at PNC Park.
Christopher Horner | Tribune-Review
Pirates catcher Russell Martin drives in the winning run during the eighth inning against the Cardinals on Wednesday, July 31, 2013, at PNC Park.
Christopher Horner | Tribune-Review
Pirates second baseman Neil Walker scores the winning run during the eighth inning against the Cardinals on Wednesday, July 31, 2013, at PNC Park.

Weekly errands for Clint Hurdle usually turn into more than just a visit to the dry cleaner, the barber shop or the grocery store.

The trips serve as barometers for what's happening in his professional life, the Pirates manager said, because everywhere he goes people like to share what they're thinking and feeling about his team at that moment.

On Wednesday morning, after his team swept a doubleheader the day before to take the first three of a five-game series against the St. Louis Cardinals, Hurdle walked into his local Starbucks and got a standing ovation.

His team got one of its own from the 31,679 fans at PNC Park later that night as they took the field in the ninth inning following Russell Martin's two-out RBI single in the eighth that broke a 4-4 tie. Relievers Vin Mazzaro, Tony Watson and closer Mark Melancon combined for four scoreless innings, and the Pirates beat the Cardinals again, 5-4.

Only one game remains in the most anticipated series of the season so far, a five-in-four-days affair that has allowed the Pirates to not only leapfrog their NL Central rivals for the division lead but also earn the best record in baseball.

“I think we're opening up a lot of eyes,” starting pitcher Jeff Locke said. “We're not a joke. We're not that team that people want to make us be from the last two years. We're competing every time out. I've never been around a team in my life that competes for nine innings like these guys do.”

Facing NL wins leader Adam Wainwright, the Pirates had to claw their way back to tie the game in the fifth inning after the Cardinals chased Locke after four innings and 89 pitches. It was Locke's shortest outing of the season, and he gave up a career-worst 10 hits.

But even though it was the most off-and-on Hurdle said he's seen Locke, the four runs allowed didn't equal a death sentence for his teammates.

“Of course I came out of the game frustrated, but there wasn't one moment where I thought we weren't going to win,” Locke said. “You just know what you've got with these guys every time out. At the end of the day, I wasn't crying about it and saying we're not going to win today because I didn't do good. I know for a fact these guys are going to fight for nine. That's what we did, and that's why we've been winning.”

Locke gave up a pair of runs on four singles in a 30-pitch first inning to give the Cardinals their first lead of the series. Coming into the game, the left-hander had been charged with three or fewer earned runs in each of his last 17 starts and 18 of 20 overall.

But the Cardinals seemed due to produce some offense.

Despite being outscored by the Pirates, 17-3, in the first three games of the series and totaling just six runs during the first six games of their now-seven-game losing streak, the Cardinals still entered the day as the best hitting team in the National League with a .271 average.

They finished with 13 hits, including three from Matt Holliday and a pair from four other players, but the Cards left 11 on base and couldn't pull ahead against the Pirates' relievers.

“We had a good night (offensively),” Cardinals manager Mike Matheny said. “Usually, when we have (Wainwright) on the mound, that's going to be enough. But there's days when we've got to score more.”

The Pirates cut the Cardinals' lead to one in the bottom of the first on an RBI single from Pedro Alvarez.

Neil Walker hit his first home run since June 26 in the bottom of the third inning to make it 3-2, and Clint Barmes hit a two-out double to drive in a run in the fourth to make it 4-3. The Pirates finally tied it in the fifth on a sacrifice fly by Andrew McCutchen that scored Starling Marte.

“I think our offense has sharpened up since we've gotten home,” Hurdle said. “We fought and scratched, stayed in the shadow until we tied it then got one up on them late.”

The Pirates have won four in a row overall and six straight against the Cardinals in one season for the first time since they won 13 in a row in 1992.

Karen Price is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. Reach her at kprice@tribweb.com or via Twitter @KarenPrice_Trib.

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