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Golf roundup: Watney wins in Malaysia

| Sunday, Oct. 28, 2012, 7:27 p.m.
REUTERS
Nick Watney (Reuters)

KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia — Nick Watney missed a chance for a 59 on Sunday in his CIMB Classic victory, closing with a course-record 10-under-par 61 at The Mines despite a bogey at the 18th.

Needing a birdie on the par-4 18th for a 59, Watney drove into the left rough, failed to reach the green with his approach and left his long birdie pitch just short of the putting surface.

“I really wanted to finish strong ... but winning the tournament was more important than a 59 for me,” Watney said.

The American finished at 22-under 262 and earned $1.3 million in the unofficial PGA Tour event, finishing a stroke ahead of 2011 champion Bo Van Pelt and Robert Garrigus and three ahead of Tiger Woods. The tournament will become a full-fledged PGA Tour event next year when the tour begins its new season in October after the FedEx Cup.

“I saw Tiger got off to a good start, so I wasn't really thinking about winning when I teed off,” he said. “But the round sort of built momentum, and things just kept getting better and better. I'm thrilled to have come away with the win.”

Van Pelt and Garrigus tied for second, each carding 66 after starting the round tied for the lead.

Needing a birdie on 18 to force a playoff, Van Pelt saved par after hitting into a greenside bunker. On Saturday, needing a closing birdie for a 59, he made a double bogey for a 62.

After five birdies on the first seven holes, Woods finished with a 63 to tie for fourth at 19-under with Chris Kirk and Brendon de Jonge. Kirk shot 67, and de Jonge had a 66.

The heat, humidity and rain on the par-71 course combined to make it a unique win for Watney. He needed his wife, Amber, to carry his bag for the last hole of the first round when caddie Chad Reynolds needed treatment for heat-stroke Thursday. Watney used a local caddie Friday, and Reynolds came back for the weekend.

European PGA Tour

In Shanghai, Peter Hanson won the BMW Masters for his second European PGA Tour victory of the year, shooting 5-under 67 to hold off Ryder Cup teammate Rory McIlroy by a stroke.

Hanson finished at 21-under 267 on The Masters Course at Lake Malaren and earned $1,166,600. He won the KLM Open last month in the Netherlands and has six career tour victories.

“This is by far my biggest win, so it feels great,” he said.

LPGA Tour

In Yang Mei, Taiwan, Suzann Pettersen won the Taiwan Championship for her second straight LPGA Tour victory, rallying to beat Inbee Park by three strokes.

Pettersen closed with a 3-under 69 in wind and drizzle at the Sunrise course. The Norwegian finished with a 19-under 269 and earned $300,000 for her 10th LPGA Tour title.

“It is a great win for me, especially coming back from behind in tough conditions like today,” Pettersen said. “I just focused on every shot and stuck to my game plan.”

Champions Tour

In San Antonio, David Frost won the AT&T Championship, beating Bernhard Langer with a birdie on the second hole of a playoff after overcoming a six-stroke deficit in the final round.

Frost and Langer each shot 6-under 66 to finish at 8-under 208 on TPC San Antonio's Canyons Course.

Web.com Tour

In McKinney, Texas, Justin Bolli closed with a 6-under 65 to win the Web.com Tour Championship and earn a PGA Tour card for next year.

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