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Golf roundup: Oosthuizen opens 5-stroke HSBC lead

| Friday, Nov. 2, 2012, 8:27 p.m.
Louis Oosthuizen from South Africa hits the bunker shot at the ninth hole during the second round of the HSBC Champions on Friday Nov. 2, 2012, in Shenzhen, China. (AP)

SHENZHEN, China — Louis Oosthuizen shot a 9-under-par 63 on Friday to open up a five-stroke lead after the second round of the HSBC Champions at Mission Hills.

The 2010 British Open champion, the co-leader overnight, had eight birdies and an eagle to offset one bogey. He was at 16-under 128 going into the weekend.

Reigning British Open champion Ernie Els and Adam Scott were tied second at 11-under.

Els, who had been in a share of 19th place after the first round, made seven birdies on the front nine for a 29 — the lowest nine-hole score of the day. He finished with a 63.

Shane Lowry and Jason Dufner were in fourth place, six strokes back at 10-under.

Phil Mickelson moved into contention with two eagles on the front nine but double-bogeyed his final hole to fall into a share of sixth with Dustin Johnson.

Oosthuizen again made the most of the five par-5s on the Olazabal Course at Mission Hills, birdying four and making eagle on the 566-yard seventh. He birdied all five par-5s in the first round Thursday.

The South African nearly had a second eagle Friday, too. After hitting his second shot into a bunker on the par-5 ninth, he hit a difficult chip shot over a ridge and onto the green that rolled 15 feet and missed the pin by inches.

Oosthuizen is having one of his best years on tour, with two titles and a runner-up finish to Bubba Watson after a playoff at the Masters. He said the highlight was the albatross he hit on the par-5 second hole in the final round at Augusta.

He's not expecting to repeat the feat at Mission Hills but is hoping he can keep hitting well off the tee on the long holes to bag as many birdies as he can.

Mickelson, a two-time HSBC Champions winner, played a superb front nine with two eagles and two birdies to move into a share of second place with Scott at the turn.

But on the 18th, he barely cleared the lake and landed in the rough on a steep slope next to the green. Balanced awkwardly with one foot on a rock and the other on the hill, he missed the ball completely with his first swing. He popped it onto the green with his second attempt but then missed a 10-foot putt for bogey.

Scott, the co-leader with Oosthuizen after the first round, made four birdies to keep pace on the front nine before blundering an opportunity for birdie on the par-5 ninth, which he had eagled the day before.

After positioning himself well with a deep second drive that nearly reached the green, the Australian left his chip shot short, setting up a difficult 10-foot putt that he missed, resulting in a par.

Champions Tour

In Scottsdale, Ariz., Jay Haas matched the Champions Tour record with a 10-under 60 to open a five-stroke lead in the Charles Schwab Cup Championship.

The 58-year-old Haas made a 5-foot birdie putt on the par-5 18th after hitting his second shot into a greenside bunker and leaving his eagle blast short. He's 14-under for the tournament.

Haas became the eighth player in the history of the tour to shoot 60 and broke the course record on Desert Mountain's Cochise layout.

Tom Lehman was second after a 63, moving into position to win the season-long Charles Schwab Cup points race. Bernhard Langer, 211 points ahead of second-place Lehman, was tied for fifth at 6-under after a 65.

Fred Couples, paired with Haas, was third at 8-under after a 66.

LPGA Tour

In Shima, Japan, South Korea's Jiyai Shin and Japan's Ayako Uehara shot 4-under 68 to share the first-round lead in the Mizuno Classic.

Shin won the event at Kintetsu Kashikojima 2008 and in '10. She won the Kingsmill Championship and Women's British Open in consecutive starts in September.

Defending champion Momoko Ueda of Japan was a stroke back.

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