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Day leads Masters by 1 stroke after 2nd round

| Friday, April 12, 2013, 9:31 p.m.
Jason Day tees off on the fourth hole during the second round of the Masters on Friday, April 12, 2013, in Augusta, Ga.
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Jason Day plays during the second round of the Masters on Friday, April 12, 2013, at Augusta National Golf Club in Augusta, Ga.

AUGUSTA, Ga. — Jason Day is out front midway through the Masters.

Guan Tianlang, a 14-year-old from China, became the youngest player to make the cut in PGA Tour history despite taking a one-stroke penalty on the 17th hole for slow play.

Day, an Australian, shot a 4-under 68 that gave him a 6-under 138 total, good enough for a one-stroke lead over Fred Couples and first-round co-leader Marc Leishman.

Tiger Woods had a share of the top spot until a tough finish knocked him back. He struck the flagstick at No. 15, sending the ball careening back into the water. Only a brilliant little pitch on the do-over allowed him to save bogey at a hole where he should have had a good chance for a birdie.

Then, on 18, Woods misjudged the distance just a bit on the approach, wound up on the back tier of the green and three-putted for another bogey.

He finished at 71 and three shots back at 141, a score that easily could have been two or three shots lower.

“I really played well,” Woods said. “The score is not indicative of quite how well I played.”

Everyone within 10 shots of the lead will be back on Saturday.

A rainy morning turned into a sunny, blustery afternoon, which sent scores much higher than they were in the opening round. Guan said it took him longer to judge distances and pick clubs because of the wind.

Leishman, a 29-year-old Australian with only one PGA Tour victory, kept up his solid play in the tough conditions, while others skidded down the board.

They included Sergio Garcia, who was tied with Leishman at the end of the first round after both shot 6-under 66. The Spaniard had a 76 that knocked him back but not out. He was four strokes back.

Dustin Johnson surged to 7-under and the top spot on the board before a dismal finish ruined his day. He laid up at the par-5 15th hole then dunked his third shot in the water, leading to a double-bogey. He bogeyed the 17th and took another double-bogey at the final hole to finish with 76.

Instead of leading, he was five shots back at 1-under 143.

Some former champions fared better.

Couples, playing in his favorite tournament at age 53, birdied the final hole for a 71. Angel Cabrera birdied five of the last six holes, signed for a 69 and was another shot back at 140.

“It's a hard course out there,” Couples said. “I felt very good about what I shot. I had a couple of little hiccups out there and did some other good things to shoot my score. But the golf course is winning today.”

Cabrera actually posted a better score in the tougher conditions than he did Thursday, when he shot 71. He was joined at 4-under by Jim Furyk (71) and Brandt Snedeker (70).

“For me, Augusta is never easy,” said Cabrera, the 2009 Masters champion. “Never, ever easy. The big difference was that on the back nine, I was hitting very well off the tee, leaving my second shots close, and I was able to make some birdies.”

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