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Golf notebook: U.S. Open winner, long-time announcer Venturi dies

| Friday, May 17, 2013, 7:57 p.m.

Former U.S. Open champion Ken Venturi died just 12 days after he was inducted into the World Golf Hall of Fame. He was 82.

He died Friday afternoon in a hospital in Rancho Mirage, Calif., his son, Matt Venturi, said. Ken Venturi had been hospitalized the past two months for a spinal infection, pneumonia and an intestinal infection.

Venturi was all about overcoming the odds. He won the 1964 U.S. Open at Congressional while playing with severe dehydration. He overcame a stuttering problem as a kid in San Francisco to spend 35 years in the broadcast booth with CBS Sports. He also was the Presidents Cup captain in 2000.

McIlroy starts own management company

Two-time major champion Rory McIlroy is leaving Dublin-based Horizon Sports Management to set up his own management group.

A person with knowledge of the decision told The Associated Press that McIlroy will create his own team run by his father, Gerry, along with close friends and associates. The person spoke on condition of anonymity because McIlroy hasn't announced the change.

Graeme McDowell, a close friend on tour who also is represented by Horizon, said the split was “fairly amicable” and that McIlroy wanted to surround himself with family.

Northern Ireland, Ireland combine

Northern Ireland won't have its own team for the World Cup.

The International Federation of PGA Tours said last week that England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland each would be considered separate countries when the World Cup is played in November at Royal Melbourne under a new format.

The PGA Tour said Friday that only England, Scotland and Wales will have separate teams for the World Cup. Players from Northern Ireland and Ireland will continue to compete as one team under the Irish flag.

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