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Brooke Hogan has no business in TNA Wrestling

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Thursday, July 25, 2013, 10:12 p.m.
 

Wrestling fans can submit questions on Twitter by using the hashtag #TribWrestling or email me during my radio show Tuesdays at 3 p.m. on TribLIVE sports radio.

@Dan_Danielson1: how much money is Brooke Hogan making? #TribWrestling #TNAImpactWRESTLINGDOESNTMATTER

I disagree with the hashtag “TNAImpactWrestlingDoesn'tMatter.” They're a wrestling company on national television. They should matter. You should want them to matter. More options for wrestling fans and more places for guys to work are always positives.

TNA Impact wrestling matters, but lately it's for many negative reasons.

I don't know an exact figure of what Brooke Hogan is making, but whatever it is, it's too much. I refuse to believe whatever dollar figure is invested in her is made back by the amount of tickets or pay-per-views she sells on the fact she's part of the company.

If she is still working behind the scenes with the Knockouts division as she once was, where is the benefit? She's never wrestled a day in her life. I don't care that she's spent her whole life around wrestling because of her father. TNA Impact can pride itself on how good some of their female wrestlers really are in the ring. I think they're doing just fine without any input from Hulk Hogan's daughter.

As far as I'm concerned, she's been one failed after-school activity after another. Being a pop singer didn't work out. Her own reality show didn't last long. Hey, let's sign her up for professional wrestling!

@SlimCasey316: With 2 recent legit concussions 2 big stars via kick 2 head (swagger/ziggy del rio/RKO) will we see move banned? #tribwrestling

No, I don't think WWE will ban kicks to the head.

You ban the move if you want to eliminate the risk of head injuries. If that's WWE's motive, there's a laundry list of other maneuvers to consider eliminating to ensure head safety.

The fact we've seen a higher number of guys taken off television with possible injuries isn't because there have been more injuries. It means WWE is taking better precautions than they had previously. There have always been head injuries or risks in wrestling; they were just ignored or not properly addressed.

A common theme from wrestling to the NFL to the MLB is the lack of care for concussions, steroid use and painkillers. Today, these organizations seem to be seeing these as a bigger deal and trying to regulate them more closely.

Professional wrestlers are trained. There is a right way and wrong way to do things. Getting physically banged up and taking simple precautions are inevitable given the nature of the industry. If anything should be brought under a microscope, it should be those who are “injuring” others. If it's a repeat issue with the same people, are they being too careless in the ring?

@jasonkmorey: #TribWRESTLING will we see @UltimateWarrior wrestle again?

I don't think we're ever going to see Ultimate Warrior in a 30-minute classic again. Come to think of it, I don't know if we ever saw Warrior in a 30-minute classic.

If we saw Bret Hart have a return “match” in WWE against Vince McMahon, of course it's possible to see it with Warrior.

After having a stroke years ago, Hart was obviously limited in what he could really do and the risks he could take. However, the billboard of Hart vs. McMahon certainly was enough to peak interest on a stage like WrestleMania. The “match” was terrible. It was really hardly even a match at all, rather something designed to be closure to a publicized story of bad blood launched courtesy of the 1997 Montreal Screw Job.

The Warrior has a different situation. While Hart's issues with WWE took place right in front of the world, Warrior's have been more behind the scenes. If WWE wanted to get a payday out of Warrior versus McMahon, they would have to tell the whole story over again, which would involve them speaking negatively about Warrior's career: holding McMahon up for money, not showing up to events, being difficult to work with. Everything that was told in the “Self Destruction of the Ultimate Warrior” DVD that Warrior understandably didn't appreciate would have to be put back out there in order to set up the conclusion of this feud.

I don't know if Warrior wants to do that, and I don't know if enough of the younger and more casual fans care.

Nonetheless, it's always a possibility that we see Warrior advertised for some showdown, whether it is a match or just a segment now that it seems the bridge is starting to be mended with WWE.

Of course, the real money is in hearing another classic Warrior promo. You just have to hear them to believe them.

Trib Total Media staffer Justin LaBar has a wrestling column every Monday and Friday. He also hosts Wrestling Reality at sportstalk.triblive.com every Tuesday from 3 to 5 p.m.

 

 

 
 


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