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TNA gets it wrong with this Angle angle

| Sunday, Oct. 20, 2013, 11:27 p.m.
ImpactWrestling.com
Pittsburgh native Kurt Angle

TNA has made its Hall of Fame completely laughable, and it's only been around for one year.

Kurt Angle was going to be the second member, with Sting the first inductee last year. Angle turned down the induction in a speech given Sunday night during TNA's pay-per-view. He said he doesn't deserve it and wants to set a new standard.

Angle then loses to Bobby Roode and gets carried out of the match on a stretcher.

TNA is slapping its own Hall of Fame in the face. Making it a gimmick. Angle uses it to further a storyline, which is ridiculous. The ceremony the night before didn't even have company president Dixie Carer there because she's now a heel on-camera, and they wanted to protect her character.

What?

Hall of Fames aren't supposed to be a work. It's a night to drop kayfabe. You have every other night in the year to further storylines. Too often they can't do it right then, so don't tarnish what should be a good ceremony to celebrate great performers.

It all piles up on the case of why TNA can't be taken seriously on so many levels. It can't even honor people correctly.

WWE's Hall of Fame gets criticized for the lack of consistent criteria on who goes in each year to its class ― but at least it's done with the proper presentation. It's a spectacle. It's a big deal. It's about the people being inducted.

You would never see a storyline furthered in it and wouldn't ever hear about the boss not being in attendance or the attendance only being 250 people.

I feel sorry for Angle. He deserves better than this. He's above TNA. He won't end his career in TNA. How many guys is that the situation for? Angle, Sting, Hulk Hogan. They're all going to end their careers with WWE and have stated so in one way or another that it's what they would like to do.

The reality is TNA was greener grass at one point with an easier work schedule. It was a chance to be part of something different that maybe flourishes and expands the wrestling industry. It didn't.

At the end of the day, this TNA Hall of Fame induction rejection angle won't mean much to Angle's career. TNA will be a chapter in his biography to glance at. The real selling point to those buying the book will be his collegiate level accomplishments, his Olympic win, his WWE success and inevitable return.

When rejecting the induction, Angle said he would join Sting in the Hall of Fame when he feel he deserves it. This will happen, but it will be WWE's Hall of Fame. It deserves Angle, and Angle deserves it. I can't say the same for TNA Wrestling.

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