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Steelers ticket prices again below league average

The Pittsburgh Steelers not only are one of the NFL's most consistent teams on the field, they're also one of the league's most affordably priced to watch in person.

That is, if an average ticket price of $67.47 can be considered a bargain.

Based on research by Chicago-based Team Marketing Report, the Steelers' average ticket price ranks 17th in the 32-team league and is nearly $5 below the league average of $72.28.

The three-time Super Bowl champion New England Patriots have the league's highest average price, $117.84, an increase of 29.6 percent from last season. The Buffalo Bills, who play in a huge stadium and haven't made the playoffs since the 1999 season, have the lowest average price of $51.24 for their seven games that will be played in the United States. They also play one game in Toronto.

The Tampa Bay Buccaneers had the second highest price increase, 24.4 percent, to $90.13, the second-highest average in the league.

The Indianapolis Colts, who are moving into a new stadium, jumped prices 10.5 percent to $81.13. The Philadelphia Eagles' average of $69.00 is the 15th highest, but is also below the average.

The Steelers' average premium seat ticket of $204.34 is also below the league average of $212.56. The Patriots again have the highest average price of $566.67 for tickets that come with at least one amenity; the Kansas City Chiefs have the lowest at $110.00. The San Francisco 49ers are the only team that does not offer such seating, according to the survey.

The Eagles, with an average of $202.82, are about $10 below the league average.

The Super Bowl champion New York Giants, surprisingly, are among the most affordable teams for premium seating with an average price of $139.05. Only the Chiefs offer lower-priced premium seating.

The Steelers also rank below the league average in Team Marketing Report's fan cost index, which includes the prices for four average-priced seats, two small draft beers, four small soft drinks, four regular-sized hot dogs, parking for one car, two game programs and two adult-size adjustable caps.

The Steelers charge $384.38, which is below the league average of $396.36 and represents an increase of 1.6 percent from last season. The Patriots ($596.25) again charge the most and the Bills ($298.96) the least. The Bills are the only NFL team that charge below $300; in 2007, four teams were below $300.

The Eagles are 18th at $383.50 despite playing in one of the NFL's largest cities. Most of the teams that are below the league average play in smaller markets.

According to Team Marketing Report, NFL ticket prices have increased an average of about $5 per season in each of the last four years.

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