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Steelers wide receiver JuJu Smith-Schuster hits the road

Ben Schmitt
| Tuesday, Nov. 7, 2017, 11:27 a.m.
Pittsburgh Steelers rookie wide receiver JuJu Smith-Schuster announced on Twitter Tuesday, Nov. 7, 2017, that he got a driver's license. He's photographed her with Tim Rogers, right, and instructors from Rogers Driving School, based in Ross.
Twitter
Pittsburgh Steelers rookie wide receiver JuJu Smith-Schuster announced on Twitter Tuesday, Nov. 7, 2017, that he got a driver's license. He's photographed her with Tim Rogers, right, and instructors from Rogers Driving School, based in Ross.

Yield for JuJu.

Pittsburgh Steelers rookie phenom wide receiver JuJu Smith-Schuster tweeted Tuesday morning that he now has a driver's license.

"Your boy finally did it...just got my license! #ItsLit!," Smith-Schuster wrote in the 10:56 a.m. tweet.

This breaking news comes 15 days before Smith-Schuster's 21st birthday.

He posted a photo of himself and three other people holding a Terrible Towel in front of a white Hyundai Elantra from Rogers Driving School in Ross.

Tim Rogers, owner of the driving school, said Smith-Schuster was jovial and happy to take photos with the staff. He said Smith-Schuster took the test at 9:30 a.m. at Rogers, which is a certified third-party tester for the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation.

A crew for NFL Films captured the achievement, Rogers said, adding Smith-Schuster perfectly executed a parallel parking maneuver.

"He was a natural and had a perfect score," Rogers said. "We took him out on McKnight Road, and joked around that if you can drive there you can drive anywhere."

But what of Smith-Schuster's bike?

Two weeks ago, Smith-Schuster captured the nation's attention after someone had stolen his bike. Pittsburgh came to his aid and celebrated its subsequent retrieval. He had been pedaling his hybrid Ghost brand bike daily to and from practice and around town.

He got the bike back after someone turned it over to the Mt. Oliver Police Department.

Throughout the football season, Smith-Schuster said teammate Alejandro Villanueva has been teaching him to drive.

Hopefully, Villanueva properly explained the Pittsburgh left maneuver.

Ben Schmitt is a Tribune-Review staff writer. Reach him at 412-320-7991, bschmitt@tribweb.com or via Twitter at @Bencschmitt.

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