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Steelers ticket buyers get price break as Patriots showdown nears

Paul Peirce
| Friday, Dec. 15, 2017, 12:24 p.m.
Steelers quarterback Ben Roethlisberger celebrates with LeVeon Ball after a fourth-quarter touchdown against the Ravens Sunday, Dec. 10, 2017 at Heinz Field.
Chaz Palla | Tribune-Review
Steelers quarterback Ben Roethlisberger celebrates with LeVeon Ball after a fourth-quarter touchdown against the Ravens Sunday, Dec. 10, 2017 at Heinz Field.

As the 4:25 p.m. Sunday kickoff quickly approaches for the playoff-like AFC showdown between the New England Patriots and Pittsburgh Steelers at Heinz Field, ticket prices on some online sites have dipped since Tuesday.

Just before noon Friday, a fan could grab two seats in the north end zone in section 523 for $209 at SeatGeek.com. On Tuesday, the cheapest seats for the big game on the site were $224.

Those seats normally sell to season ticket-holders for $96 each, according to the Pittsburgh Steelers' website.

StubHub.com had some tickets for sale in section 522 Friday for $229.

There's even better news for Steelers or Patriots fans who want a premium seat on the first level at the 50-yard line behind the Steelers bench: Prices have dropped dramatically this week. On Tuesday, some seats behind the Steelers bench in section 135 cost $722 on SeatGeek.com. By Friday, seats in section 135 were offered for $573 and two seats in section 134 were available at $420 each.

Chris Leyden, a content analyst for SeatGeek, said earlier this week that both teams' success this year and their enthusiastic fan bases had pushed up ticket prices. The game ultimately could determine who gets home field advantage through the playoffs.

Leyden predicted that prices could drop as game time gets closer.

“Some ticket-holders don't want to get caught holding on to the tickets, so they may reduce them a little,” he said.

Due to the high demand, the Steelers front office warned fans to watch out for counterfeit tickets when they purchase them from scalpers. The Steelers encouraged fans to visit the NFL TicketExchange to buy and sell verified tickets.

Paul Peirce is a Tribune-Review staff writer. Reach him at 724-850-2860, ppeirce@tribweb.com or via Twitter @ppeirce_trib.

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