ShareThis Page

Steelers' Ryan Shazier owes no explanation on recovery, Sporting News says

Ben Schmitt
| Friday, Jan. 12, 2018, 11:51 a.m.
Steelers linebacker Ryan Shazier warms up before a game against the Titans Thursday, Nov. 16, 2017, at Heinz Field.
Christopher Horner | Tribune-Review
Steelers linebacker Ryan Shazier warms up before a game against the Titans Thursday, Nov. 16, 2017, at Heinz Field.
Steelers cornerback William Gay's pregame shoes feature a tribute to Ryan Shazier during warm-up before a game against the Ravens Sunday, Dec. 10, 2017, at Heinz Field.
Christopher Horner | Tribune-Review
Steelers cornerback William Gay's pregame shoes feature a tribute to Ryan Shazier during warm-up before a game against the Ravens Sunday, Dec. 10, 2017, at Heinz Field.

One person controls the information about Pittsburgh Steelers linebacker Ryan Shazier's injury progress and that person is Shazier, the Sporting News wrote in a retort to a GQ magazine piece that questioned why more details of his recovery haven't been released.

"The NFL has not controlled the narrative regarding Ryan Shazier's injury," the article by Mike DeCourcy argues . "The Steelers made their last formal statement on the matter when they placed him on injured reserve. Shazier is the one who has been in charge of his story since the moment he was carted off the field in Cincinnati."

On Thursday, GQ's Drew Magary riled some when he wrote : "But this isn't about Shazier. This is about the Steelers, and the NFL, deftly sidestepping the obvious horrors of Shazier's injury and turning it into a bizarre rah-rah story."

DeCourcy countered: "Magary did allow that Shazier is entitled to his privacy as he works to recover from the injury. You know what else Shazier is entitled to own, which the writer did not mention? His story."

Shazier sustained the injury on Dec. 4 in Cincinnati.

"That night, he did not give the thumbs-up signal so many football players have after punishing hits left them prone on the field, with spectators in the stadium and watching on television wondering whether this might be the one, wishing or praying to spot some lower-body movement," DeCourcy writes. "Shazier was obviously frightened, and placing his hands up near his head as he approached the tunnel at Paul Brown Stadium invited everyone to be frightened with him.

"Since that moment, though, Shazier has been determined to frame his circumstance in the most positive light. He FaceTimed with the Steelers from his hospital bed a week later, after they clinched the AFC North championship with a victory over Baltimore. He made a surprise appearance for the team's big showdown with New England, surrounded — and no doubt protected — by family and the glass separating the luxury box from the regular fans at Heinz Field, the whole of his situation still a mystery to those who follow the team and the league."

Perhaps Shazier will have the last word.

On Friday, he posted an image on Instagram, writing: "412 x Ryan Shazier✨#SHALIEVE —full details announced later today."

412 x Ryan Shazier✨#SHALIEVE —full details announced later today

A post shared by Ryan Shazier (@shazier) on

Ben Schmitt is a Tribune-Review staff writer.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.