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Ravens' Suggs says Harrison has been 'red-flagged'

Terrell Suggs can't bring himself to feel bad for anybody who plays for the Steelers, but the Pro Bowl linebacker for the Baltimore Ravens can't help but feel that James Harrison is getting a raw deal from the NFL.

Suggs said during today's conference call with the Pittsburgh media that there has been injustice with Harrison when it comes to being fined by the league.

“Your guy over there, 92, I think he is red-flagged,” Suggs said. “The referees are kind of looking for him. Even if he breathes on a quarterback wrong, he might get a flag.”

Harrison was fined for the fourth time this season yesterday when he was fined $25,000 for a hit put on Buffalo quarterback Ryan Fitzpatrick.

Harrison has been fined $125,000 so far this season.

“I think they are looking at him more closely than they are everybody else in the league,” Suggs said. “In the referee world, they kind of red-flagged him.”

Suggs also went on to say that quarterbacks like New England's Tom Brady and Indianapolis' Peyton Manning get preferential treatment over other quarterbacks in the league.

“The league has their favorites,” Suggs said. “One being in Indy and one being with that other team up north. Besides those two, everybody is fair game. Some quarterbacks are getting the calls right away. Some quarterbacks they don't care.

"Like I always said, Carson Palmer got hit in his knee in 2005 but there was no rule made. Then Tom Brady got hit in his knee and all of a sudden there is a rule and possible suspensions, excessive fines — it's just getting ridiculous.”

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