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Bradshaw admits to steroid use

Former Steelers quarterback Terry Bradshaw told a syndicated talk show host last week that he took steroids as a player to accelerate recovery when he had injuries, and he said his teammates did the same thing.

Bradshaw told Dan Patrick of Sports Illustrated that he didn't take steroids to get bigger or stronger and added that he took them per doctors' orders.

"It was to speed up the healing process, and that was it," Bradshaw said last Thursday on the "Dan Patrick Show." "I lifted in the offseason, did all that on my own. I never took those things on my own."

Bradshaw couldn't be reached for comment. The Steelers also couldn't be reached for comment.

Bradshaw, however, clarified his position yesterday during an interview with the New York Daily News. He said he was referring to therapeutical corticosteroid injections and not anabolic steroids, which are banned by the NFL.

Corticosteroids, which are used to reduce inflammation, are not on the NFL's list of banned substances.

"I'm not bodybuilding here," Bradshaw told the Daily News. "They were not those kind of steroids. They were anti-inflammatories."

Bradshaw, the first overall pick in the 1970 NFL Draft, led the Steelers to four Super Bowl titles and is a member of the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

He played his entire career in Pittsburgh and said he "thought nothing of" taking steroids in an attempt to recover from injuries. He told Patrick that steroid use resulted from the culture that prevailed when he played.

Players, Bradshaw said, were expected to play through just about any injury.

"If you could walk and halfway talk, you played," he told Patrick. "We took shots, got shot up. We did steroids to get rid of aches and speed up the healing."

Bradshaw, now a Fox NFL studio analyst, said the NFL and NFL Players Association do a much better job of curbing steroid use through random testing, sanctions for players caught taking steroids and education.

The NFL didn't test for steroids when Bradshaw played.

"I think our league and (players') association is doing a good job now of testing and trying to make sure these players are aware of what can happen," Bradshaw said on the show. "You get caught now, it affects you."

Additional Information:

Listen to the interview

In a radio interview with Dan Patrick, Steelers Super Bowl quarterback Terry Bradshaw acknowledges that he was treated with steroids during his playing days to help him heal from injuries.

Click here to find the interview. It?s listed under ?Thursday.?

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