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Steelers' David Johnson will see time at fullback, tight end

| Tuesday, Aug. 7, 2012, 7:20 p.m.

• Apparently, the return to the prototypical fullback in the Steelers' offense was greatly exaggerated. Mike Tomlin said he doesn't view David Johnson exclusively as a fullback and will use him in various tight end roles as well. “We made the commitment to work him in the spring and the early portions of training camp as a fullback to give him that exposure. But I've also found opportunities to play him at tight end, such as the tight ends versus the outside linebacker positions. We're going to allow him to play tight end some.”

• General manager Kevin Colbert said that unless a major injury occurs to one of the top three receivers — Antonio Brown, Emmanuel Sanders and Jerricho Cotchery — the Steelers aren't actively seeking to add an outsider the group, regardless of Mike Wallace's holdout. Colbert told TribLive Radio that the Steelers would be more interested in bringing in a player who took part in spring practices with an organization before signing someone who hasn't played in eight months. “Very rarely do you go to a guy who hasn't been in a training camp or OTAs or minicamps. You like to get the guys that are active,” Colbert said.

• Rookie running back Chris Rainey wears 22 rubber wrist bands (his jersey number is 22) with sayings from “Grind” to “Thank You God” to “Truth.” “I wear them everywhere, anywhere, never take them off, not even in the shower,” Rainey said. However, if Rainey wears them during Thursday's first preseason game, he will be fined for a uniform code violation. “I heard about it. I am going to wrap them up. I'm not going to let them see them.”

— Mark Kaboly

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