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Bears subdue Lions, 13-7

| Tuesday, Oct. 23, 2012, 12:24 a.m.
Bears linebacker Brian Urlacher (54) celebrates with Israel Idonije (71) and Nick Roach (53) after he recovered a fumble against the Lions near the goal line in the second half in Chicago on Monday, Oct. 22, 2012. AP Photo/Kiichiro Sato

CHICAGO — Jay Cutler shook off an apparent rib injury, Brian Urlacher made a key fumble recovery, and the Chicago Bears won their fourth straight, beating the Detroit Lions, 13-7, on Monday night.

It was certainly not an easy night for the NFC North leaders, particularly their quarterback, but they came away with the win after a week off and possibly buried Detroit (2-4) in the process despite getting a major scare along the way.

That happened in the second quarter when Cutler was sacked by Ndamukong Suh and ultimately wound up going to the locker room to have his ribs examined.

Cutler started the second half and was 16 of 31 for 150 yards and a touchdown in the game, but with the defense locking down the Lions, the Bears (5-1) prevailed. It was a huge blow for last-place Detroit, a team many expected to contend for the division championship after making the playoffs for the first time in more than a decade.

The Lions simply never got in gear, and when they had chances, they blew them. The biggest came early in the third quarter, when Joique Bell fumbled at the goal line with the Bears leading, 13-0.

Urlacher recovered and Chicago hung on from there, sending Detroit to its fourth loss in five games.

Brandon Marshall caught six passes for 81 yards and scored a touchdown on Chicago's first possession. Matt Forte ran for 96 yards, and with the defense doing its part again, Chicago never really was threatened.

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