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Steelers' offense searching for long ball

| Thursday, Nov. 8, 2012, 10:22 p.m.
Steelers quarterback Ben Roethlisberger throws a third quarter interception under pressure from the Giants' Linval Joseph on Sunday, Nov. 4, 2012, at MetLife Stadium in East Rutherford, N.J. Chaz Palla | Tribune-Review

It's no secret the deep ball is missing from the Steelers' offense. Ben Roethlisberger has attempted 29 passes of 20 yards or more, hitting 7 for 231 yards, three touchdowns and three interceptions. Among NFL starters, only Robert Griffin III (18) and Matt Schaub (24) have fewer deep throws, according to profootballfocus.com. The other AFC North QBs have far more attempts: Joe Flacco (47), Brandon Weeden (42) and Andy Dalton (34).

“We just try to have a happy medium. When do we take our shots? We still have to have those plays because we've got guys that can stretch the field,” Roethlisberger said. “We also have guys that we feel we can get them catches short and let them run long. Whatever works, as long as we get in the end zone, it doesn't matter how we get there.”

Tomlin popular in poll

Mike Tomlin was chosen as the coach that NFL players would prefer to play for, based on a midseason vote of 107 players by The Sporting News. Tomlin got 31 votes; Bill Belichick of New England was second with 10. Greg Schiano of Tampa Bay edged Belichick, 20-19, as the coach that players would least like to play for. The Patriots and Steelers were voted 1-2 for the best organization. James Harrison came in fourth for the NFL's dirtiest player.

— Alan Robinson

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