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Steelers notebook: Defensive lineman Ta'amu released

| Monday, Nov. 12, 2012, 6:14 p.m.

Steelers defensive lineman Alameda Ta'amu's rookie-year problems on the field didn't begin to approximate those off the field.

Now, their supposed nose tackle of the future might be in the Steelers' past even before he has played in an NFL game.

Ta'amu, facing numerous charges from a South Side police chase Oct. 14 that required four police officers to subdue him, was cut Monday so the Steelers could activate receiver David Gilbreath for their game against the Kansas City Chiefs. Gilbreath returned punts with Antonio Brown inactive.

If Ta'amu clears waivers, he could join the Steelers' practice squad — if they still aren't ready to give up on a fourth-round draft pick who was envisioned last spring as a possible replacement for Casey Hampton.

Ta'amu, a 22-year-old former Washington lineman, had a disappointing training camp and was inactive for their first five games, then was suspended following the Oct. 14 incident. He waived a preliminary hearing last week on numerous charges, including those for assault and drunken driving.

• Safety Ryan Clark left the game late in the fourth quarter with possible concussion after tackling Kansas City receiver Dwayne Bowe. Both teams were charged time outs because their injuries occurred in the final two minutes.

• Kansas City hadn't scored a first-quarter touchdown all season until Jamaal Charles sliced through the Steelers' defense for a 12-yard score to give the Chiefs a 7-0 lead.

• Receiver Emmanuel Sanders, fined $15,000 for apparently faking an injury at Cincinnati, seemed distracted early. As he did in Friday's practice, Sanders had a difficult time holding onto the ball. He dropped a pass on the Steelers' opening possession. In the second quarter, Sanders failed to come back to a Ben Roethlisberger pass that cornerback Eric Berry nearly intercepted at the goal line.

• ESPN's Chris Berman apologized for a sign that read “Drink and Drunk” in reference to quarterback Ben Roethlisberger and the Steelers' passing game. The network later changed the sign to read “Dink and Dunk.”

• The Steelers yield only 68 rushing yards to the New York Giants. The Chiefs attacked the left side of the defense (DE Ziggy Hood and LB LaMarr Woodley) for 68 yards in the first quarter.

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