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Greene, Bettis among finalists for Hall

| Friday, Jan. 11, 2013, 10:18 a.m.

Jerome Bettis will try to hit the end zone on third down again.

Bettis, the mega-sized running back who gained more yards for the Steelers than anyone except Franco Harris, is a finalist for the Pro Football Hall of Fame for the third consecutive year.

Former Steelers outside linebacker Kevin Greene, a skilled pass rusher for the Blitzburgh defenses of the 1990s, also is among the 15 finalists. The inductees, who can number anywhere from four to seven, will be announced Feb. 2, the day before the Super Bowl in New Orleans.

Bettis is the sixth-leading rusher in NFL history and the only one of the top 10 not enshrined in Canton. He ran for 13,662 yards for the Rams and Steelers, with most — 10,571 yards — coming with the Steelers from 1996 to 2005. He had eight 1,000-yard seasons.

Bettis retired after the Steelers won the Super Bowl in his hometown of Detroit during the 2005 season.

The other modern-era finalists include Cowboys offensive lineman Larry Allen, Raiders wide receiver Tim Brown, Vikings/Eagles wide receiver Cris Carter, former 49ers owner Edward J. DeBartolo Jr., 49ers and Cowboys defensive end Charles Haley, former Browns and Ravens owner Art Modell and Ravens tackle Jonathan Ogden.

The other finalists are former coach Bill Parcells, Bills wide receiver Andre Reed, Bucs and Raiders defensive tackle Warren Sapp, Chiefs guard Will Shields, Giants defensive end Michael Strahan and Cardinals and Rams defensive back Aeneas Williams.

The two seniors committee finalists are former Chiefs and Oilers defensive tackle Curley Culp and Packers and Redskins linebacker Dave Robinson. The selection committee will weigh the merits of both candidates and can choose to enshrine either, both or neither.

Alan Robinson is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. Reach him at arobinson@tribweb.com or via Twitter @arobinson_Trib.

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