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Steelers notebook: Redman hopes drop in weight translates into longer runs

| Thursday, Aug. 1, 2013, 7:24 p.m.

Isaac Redman always has been known as a power running back. Now he wants to be known as a power running back with speed enough to rip off an occasional 20-yard run. Redman lost nearly 20 pounds from last year's 230-pound playing weight and noticed the impact immediately. “It shows on film that I am a couple steps quicker than I was,” he said. Redman hopes that translates into longer runs. The Steelers had only eight runs of 20 yards or longer last year. “I have always been powerful, (but) I felt like being a little quicker would actually help my power,” he said.

• Right tackle Mike Adams is two months removed from being stabbed in the abdomen and suffering a punctured colon during an attempted carjacking incident on the South Side but don't expect any special treatment fromMike Tomlin. “I am not ever going to describe Mike Adams' performance ‘in light of what happened.' When the doctors told me he had a clean bill of health and medical clearance, that is in our rearview mirror. I am not going to judge him on a curve in regards of what happened.”

• Rookie guard Nik Embernate suffered what appeared a season-ending knee injury during one-on-one drills. Embernate got his cleat stuck into the ground during the third go-around with defensive end Cordian Haggans and fell to the ground in pain.

• Some of the Steelers' personnel were dressed nicer Thursday because of VIP guests on campus. The Steelers ownership group, headed byDan Rooney and Art Rooney II, was joined by minority partners, including former wide receiver John Stallworth, Art Rooney Jr.,John Rooney andScott Swank.

—Mark Kaboly

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