ShareThis Page

Inside the ropes: Steelers work on 2-minute drill

| Wednesday, Aug. 14, 2013, 9:30 p.m.
Chaz Palla | Tribune-Review
Steelers nose tackle Steve McLendon chases quarterback Ben Roethlisberger during practice Wednesday, Aug. 1, 2013, at St. Vincent in Latrobe.
Chaz Palla | Tribune-Review
Steelers defensive tackle Brett Keisel during practice Wednesday, Aug. 1, 2013, at St. Vincent in Latrobe.

The Steelers worked on their two-minute drill during practice Wednesday evening at St. Vincent but not with quarterback Ben Roethlisberger or any other first-team skill guys. Steelers coach Mike Tomlin wanted to replicate who likely would be on the field during Monday's game against Washington during a two-minute situation at the end of the half or game. Neither Bruce Gradkowski nor Landry Jones fared well as both threw game-ending interceptions. Josh Victorian intercepted Gradkowski's third-down pass intended for Jerricho Cotchery, and rookie Shamarko Thomas picked off Jones a couple of plays into the third team's reps.

• Rookie outside linebacker Jarvis Jones worked plenty with the first-team defense as Jason Worilds watched from the sidelines. Worilds later returned to the first team, and Jones slid back to the second team.

• Former Steelers offensive lineman Tunch Ilkin was working with the linebackers on hand drills by having hand target pads on and showing the group the proper way to shed blocks by using their hands.

• Kicker Shaun Suisham is better known for his accuracy than ability to make long kicks. However, Suisham showed off his leg during Family Day at camp Wednesday. He kicked a 60-yard field goal during special teams coach Danny Smith's “May Day” drill, which calls for rushing onto the field for a last-second attempt with the clock running. Suisham's kick would have been good from at least 65 yards.

• The Steelers continued to shuffle their backup offensive linemen. Kelvin Beachum took reps at center and left tackle and John Malecki snaps at center and left guard. Guy Whimper and Mike Golic Jr. continued to play right guard; both started camp at tackle.

• Speedster Reggie Dunn didn't have a chance to show off his speed on special teams during last week's preseason game, but he showed a glimpse as a receiver. During 11-on-11, Dunn crossed the middle, made a catch and outraced Thomas, DaMon Cromartie-Smith and Vince Williams for a substantial gain.

• The Steelers spent a significant time working on underneath passing with a lot of inside crosses, but Roethlisberger was able to let loose on a 50-yard bomb down the right sideline to Emmanuel Sanders that beat Victorian. Roethlisberger was 5 for 5 during the “passer under pressure” drill.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.