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With typical flair, Ike Taylor breaks down language barriers in London

| Friday, Sept. 27, 2013, 9:12 a.m.
Steelers cornerback Ike Taylor speaks to the media during a press conference Friday, Sept. 27, 2013 in London.
Steelers' cornerback Ike Taylor puts on his helmet during their practice Friday, Sept. 27, 2013, at Wasps Rugby Football Club Twyford Avenue training ground in London.
Chaz Palla | Tribune-Review
Steelers cornerback Ike Taylor has a little fun with the media during a news conference Friday, Sept. 27, 2013, at the Four Seasons Hotel in London.

LONDON — Ike Taylor was in royal form in regaling the British press Friday morning shortly after the Steelers arrived at their team hotel.

To wit, some of his wit:

With the first question from a local reporter, Taylor replied, “Man, I love y'all accent.” After the room of about 75 media — mostly from European outlets — began to laugh, Taylor followed up: “Say that again?” The laughter grew.

To another question from a Brit, this one asking how frust-tray-ting 0-3 must be: “Excuse me? Your accent real thick. I like it.”

To another: “Man, y'all accent is killin' me. And I love it.”

On what he'll enjoy about the experience: “I'll tell you what: I would love to meet the queen. The head lady.”

On secondary mate Troy Polamalu: “Future Hall of Famer. Baby Jesus. Head and Shoulders. The guy's everywhere.”

On why American football is special: “I guess because we spell it different.” (We don't, of course. The Spanish for soccer, is futbol. The English is football.) Continuing unabated: “I am a fan of soccer. We are playing at a soccer stadium, right?” Well, yeah. Wembley is the world's most famous stadium for any sport.

On the difference between the two: “Y'all use your feet. We use our hands and our feet. I'm sure if y'all used your hands, there'd be a lot of penalties. But it's all good.”

By this point, the press was having a blast right back. A Danish reporter asked Taylor if he might pick up some London slang while here. Taylor retorted, “Y'all shoot me some slang words,” and back they came: Jiffy: “If I need something quick, I'm in a jiffy? OK.”

Lift: “So it's not an elevator? It's a lift. Liffffffft,” as if he'd never heard the word in another capacity.

Toilet: “I was in the airport. We call 'em restrooms. Y'all call 'em toilets.” A reporter barked out that he also could call it a “loo,” to which Taylor offered: “A loo? A jiffy loo! We have those in America. That's where you get your oil changed.”

Poor David DeCastro, a man of few words in the best of times, had to follow Taylor as the final player of the media availability.

Dejan Kovacevic is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. Reach him at dkovacevic@tribweb.com or via Twitter @Dejan_Kovacevic.

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