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AFC North notebook: Brown back in organization's good graces

| Saturday, Oct. 5, 2013, 9:00 p.m.
Cleveland Browns Hall of Fame running back Jim Brown waves after being honored in a halftime ceremony at an NFL football game between the Buffalo Bills and the Browns on Thursday, Oct. 3, 2013, in Cleveland. (AP Photo/Tony Dejak)

Jim Brown was the greatest running back of his time — and, it can be argued, of any time.

He's had an on-off relationship with his former team for decades, but a year after Brown feuded with former team president Mike Holmgren, Browns owner Jimmy Haslam made sure he was back on the payroll.

Browns coach Rob Chudzinski believes having Brown around has been more than helpful to a franchise that believes it's finally on the rise. The Browns have won three in a row after an 0-2 start.

“He's been great in terms of having him back here in the organization. He's been very supportive,” Chudzinski said. “Personally, I've enjoyed the interactions that I've had with Jim. Him sharing his wisdom and some of his perspective has really helped me, and I know it's helped the guys on the team, being somebody that they can talk to as well.”

Belichick knows Bengals history

With his unbeaten Patriots (4-0) going against the Bengals (2-2), coach Bill Belichick couldn't help but reflect upon Bengals founder Paul Brown's impact on pro football.

“The West Coast offense should be the Ohio River Offense because it's really Paul Brown's offense that (Bill) Walsh took out of there,” Belichick said. “He was so far ahead of his time in all other organizational things, a lot of schematic things. The preparation that we do, it's all very, very similar to what he did a half century ago.”

Belichick, by the way, will pass Chuck Noll and move into fifth place on the all-time NFL coaching wins list with his next victory.

Monroe delighted to be with Ravens

The Ravens (2-2) apparently beat the Steelers to left tackle Eugene Monroe, who was acquired in a trade with winless Jacksonville a day before the Steelers dealt with Arizona for Levi Brown.

Monroe is going from arguably the NFL's worst team to the reigning Super Bowl winner. He replaces Bryant McKinnie, a veteran who was having the kind of season Mike Adams is having in Pittsburgh.

The Ravens believe the more athletic Monroe is a better fit for their offense than McKinnie, who has long fought with his weight.

“To come into a situation like this, with a culture of winning, is unique,” Monroe said. “It's something that I really haven't been around. So it's exciting to experience this.”

Alan Robinson is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. Reach him at arobinson@tribweb.com or via Twitter @arobinson_Trib.

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