Share This Page

Steelers notebook: Broken hand shouldn't sideline Timmons

| Tuesday, Oct. 22, 2013, 1:27 p.m.
Christopher Horner | Tribune-Review
Steelers linebacker Lawrence Timmons brings down Ravens tight end Dallas Clark during the first quarter Sunday, Oct. 20, 2013, at Heinz Field.

• The Steelers' injury list is uncommonly long: linebackers Lawrence Timmons (broken left hand) and LaMarr Woodley (right knee soreness), right tackle Marcus Gilbert (quadriceps), defensive end Brett Keisel (ribs), wide receiver Jerricho Cotchery (abdominal strain) and left tackle Kelvin Beachum (ribs). Defensive end Cam Heyward also is fighting through an unspecified illness. Wide receiver Markus Wheaton (broken finger) will miss a third consecutive game.

• If Gilbert can't play, Guy Whimper probably will make his first start for Pittsburgh. Whimper played 48 of 59 snaps Sunday and, according to Mike Tomlin, “delivered an above-the-line performance.” Previously, Whimper hadn't taken a snap all season.

• Linebacker Jarvis Jones (concussion), who didn't play Sunday, wasn't on Tomlin's injury list. Ben Roethlisberger was bothered by what he said was “blurry vision” for a couple of plays after being hit by Ravens pass rusher Elvis Dumervil, who drew a grabbing-the-face-mask penalty.

• Running back Isaac Redman found himself fourth on the depth chart at a position where some teams carry only two players. Tomlin said the Steelers released him — a move Roethlisberger said came as a “shock” — because linebacker Kion Wilson provides more special team options.

Emmanuel Sanders, denied the longest kickoff return touchdown in Steelers history because a foot scraped the out-of-bounds line, could be used as a returner again, Tomlin said. Felix Jones has been the primary kickoff returner.

— Alan Robinson

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.