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Steelers notebook: Bills find Steel City uninviting

| Saturday, Nov. 9, 2013, 4:54 p.m.

Forty-three years, one regular-season win.

That's the Buffalo Bills' record in Pittsburgh, and it's not an enviable one. It's also not the worst one.

The Bills are 1-9 in Pittsburgh, though they did win a 1992 playoff game here. The Colts (1-10) have a worse record on the Steelers' home field than the Bills do, and that doesn't include three additional Colts playoff losses.

Three NFL teams have never won in Pittsburgh: Atlanta (0-6-1), Carolina (0-3) and Tampa Bay (0-3).

The Bills' only regular-season win was 30-21 on Sept. 28, 1975, when O.J. Simpson's 88-yard touchdown run highlighted his 227-yard rushing game.

Sad sack record

No doubt Ben Roethlisberger is glad Heinz Field has new grass between the hash marks. It might make for some softer landings.

Roethlisberger has been sacked 31 times in eight games, and is on pace to break the Steelers' single-season record of 51 by Cliff Stoudt in 1983. (Remarkably, despite those sacks, and Stoudt's 21 interceptions to only 12 TD passes, the Steelers went 10-6).

The NFL record is 76 by David Carr of the expansion Texans in 2002.

Attendance waning

Those empty seats at Heinz Field on Sunday will illustrate a growing problem in the NFL: getting fans out of their living rooms and into stadiums.

For the first time since 2007, NFL attendance rose slightly last season, when an average of 65,074 paid their way into regular-season games. That's up from 64,698 in 2011, but still off the peak of 67,755 in 2007.

Alan Robinson is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. Reach him at arobinson@tribweb.com or via Twitter @arobinson_Trib.

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