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Steelers notebook: Roethlisberger enjoys rare 1-sack afternoon

| Monday, Nov. 18, 2013, 8:00 p.m.

Ben Roethlisberger was sacked once Sunday, the first time this season he hasn't been sacked at least twice. His last previous single-sack game was Nov. 12, 2012, against the Chiefs. He still is on pace to be sacked a career-high 57 times.

• According to Pro Football Focus, Ike Taylor was in coverage for 159 of Lions receiver Calvin Johnson's 179 yards receiving. Cornerback Willie Gay allowed no receptions and broke up a pass on six targets. Left tackle Kelvin Beachum was the Steelers' highest-rated offensive lineman, and he and center Fernando Velasco didn't allow a sack or a quarterback pressure. Jason Worilds had a sack and four QB hurries while pass rushing 44 times.

• Tight end Heath Miller's eight catches matched a career high set twice previously, most recently against the Raiders last season. Miller had eight catches combined in his previous three games.

• Miller said the key play of the Steelers' decisive 97-yard drive in the fourth quarter was a 16-yard completion to Antonio Brown on third-and-9 from the 4. “Ben made good calls and put us in good situations, and we were able to move the ball down the field,” Miller said.

• The Steelers must ramp up their running game to avoid the worst rushing season in franchise history. They are averaging 76.5 yards rushing. The lowest average they have had in a 16-game season was 93 yards in 2003. Their lowest average in any season was 78 yards in 1966.

• The Bengals (7-4) are the only team left on the Steelers' schedule that has a winning record. The Dolphins and Packers are 5-5, and the Ravens and Browns are 4-6. Four of the Steelers' final six games are against division opponents. They are 4-4 against the AFC North the past two seasons after going 9-3 in 2010 and '11.

— Alan Robinson

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