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Steelers notebook: Team shows mixed history in cold-weather games

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By Alan Robinson
Saturday, Dec. 21, 2013, 10:33 p.m.
 

So how do the Steelers play in cold-weather games?

The game-time temperature Sunday in Green Bay might not be low enough to make their list of all-time cold-weather games. But the predicted snow and wind-chill temperature should make for quite the wintry day.

“They have two seasons (in Green Bay): summer and snow,” Steelers defensive coordinator Dick LeBeau said.

The Steelers have played 10 games since 1976 with a temperature of 20 or below, including a 27-11 win Nov. 24 in Cleveland, when it was 20.

They are 5-5 but have lost three of their four coldest games: 17-10 in 2-degree weather Dec. 10, 1977, in Cincinnati; 41-27 to New England in an AFC championship game in Pittsburgh (Jan. 23, 2005, 11 degrees) and 13-6 on Dec. 10, 2009 (15 degrees), in Cleveland. They beat New England, 28-10, at home in 5-degree weather Dec. 17, 1989.

Touchdown streak

Ben Roethlisberger and Tony Romo of Dallas have thrown at least one touchdown pass in 27 straight games, tying for the second-longest active streak behind Denver's Peyton Manning (37 games).

Drew Brees' 54-game streak for New Orleans was halted in November.

Breaking the mold

Offensive coordinator Todd Haley has been impressed with the season put together by the relatively short Antonio Brown, who is 5-foot-10.

“He is different than anyone I've coached,” Haley said. “Generally, (receivers who line up outside) have been big-body guys.

“He is breaking that trend right now — that's the ‘in thing' right now, the 6-5, 6-6 and 6-7 guys that can run 4.4.”

Alan Robinson is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. Reach him at arobinson@tribweb.com or via Twitter @arobinson_Trib.

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