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Super Bowl notebook: Prison keeps Broncos' Thomas' relatives from attending game

| Tuesday, Jan. 28, 2014, 9:21 p.m.

Broncos wide receiver Demaryius Thomas' mother and grandmother haven't seen him play football at any level, and they won't attend the Super Bowl on Sunday.

His mother, Katina Smith, and grandmother, Minnie Pearl Thomas, have been imprisoned since 2000 after being convicted of conspiracy to possess with the intent to distribute crack cocaine. Smith is eligible for release in 2017, but Thomas drew a life sentence as the result of two prior drug convictions. Both are in a Florida jail. Demaryius Thomas was 12 when both were sent to prison.

“I've talked to my grandmother and my mom. They both called me this week, so far, but they'll call me again before the game,” Thomas said. “The next time I see them will be after the season.”

• Broncos defensive lineman Terrance Knighton has been a force during the postseason, yet his ability to get to the quarterback worried some close family members before the AFC title game — at least those who refuse to root for the Broncos and remain Patriots fans. Knighton said they told him, “Please don't hurt Tom Brady!”

• Weather watch: Temperatures dipped into the teens Tuesday in New York, but the Seahawks and the Broncos can choose to practice indoors Wednesday. The game day forecast remains much the same, according to Accuweather: a seasonal high of 39, a low of 25 and mostly cloudy skies. No major weather system is projected to impact the first outdoor Super Bowl in a cold-weather city.

• Steelers defensive end Brett Keisel did media day interviews representing Head & Shoulders, the same shampoo Troy Polamalu endorses. So, of course, the man with the NFL's most prolific beard asked Broncos wide receiver Wes Welker about his chin stubble. Welker didn't appear to recognize Keisel.

— Alan Robinson

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