Share This Page

Steelers notebook: Shoulder pads get technological boost for Ravens game

| Thursday, July 31, 2014, 8:15 p.m.

• The Steelers will have a chip on their shoulder this season — two computer chips, in fact. Embedded in the players' shoulder pads, they will help create new statistical and player-tracking data. Each of the 15 stadiums that host Thursday night games, plus Detroit and New Orleans, are being equipped with sensors to read data. The Steelers play a Thursday night game Sept. 11 at Baltimore.

• The Steelers still don't know much about fourth-rounder Martavis Bryant, who has been plagued by minor injuries since spring. “He is big and fast, and he shows a flash every day,” offensive coordinator Todd Haley said. “But we need to really accelerate that learning process. There's a lot on his plate right now, and it starts with being out here every day.”

• The training camp injury list keeps growing. Wide receiver Darrius Heyward-Bey took a hit to the head, and rookie tight end Eric Waters hurt his lower back. Running back Le'Veon Bell (hamstring) returned but was held out of team drills, as was wide receiver C.J. Goodwin (shoulder). Also not practicing were rookie linebacker Jordan Zumwalt (groin) and tight end Rob Blanchflower (ankle).

• Ike Taylor still can't believe Troy Polamalu took safety Shamarko Thomas to California to train last month. “People cry just to get Troy's autograph,” Taylor said. “But Troy took (Thomas) under his wing, took him out there to his home, just showing him how to work.”

• Rookie nose tackle Daniel McCullers (352 pounds) is the Steelers' biggest player since Casey Hampton. “Troy and I were talking, we're going to just walk up and give him a hug,” cornerback William Gay said of trying to stay on McCullers' good side.

— Alan Robinson

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.