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Steelers quizzed on no-huddle offense

| Monday, Aug. 18, 2014, 9:30 p.m.

Ben Roethlisberger is invested heavily in the Steelers' no-huddle offense. But it's his teammates who will end up paying if it's not run correctly.

With the no-huddle expected to be a key element of Todd Haley's offense, Roethlisberger is quizzing running backs, wide receivers and tight ends each week on their responsibilities.

“We give them a five hand-signal pop quiz,” he said Monday. “They have to write down what play is called and the role they have. We keep a tally on who has the most misses. They (who miss the most) owe pizza and wings to the whole offense when it's done.”

Given how much the Steelers can eat, that could be a big investment. But Roethlisberger said the quiz is a way of keeping everybody sharp in a system that produced two early touchdowns Saturday against the Buffalo Bills.

“Even those little things (like a quiz), I've been challenging people because I feel comfortable doing it, (and) because I know we are going to do it this year,” he said. “I want guys to be up to speed on it.”

Roethlisberger liked how efficient the no-huddle was Saturday — “I thought there was only one mistake, and it was a minor one,” he said — and he is eager to see how effective it will be Thursday night in Philadelphia.

“I'd like to get a little more road work,” Roethlisberger said. “That's usually the good part about trying to get at least one series of no-huddle on the road because the communication is a little tougher.”

Alan Robinson is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. Reach him at arobinson@tribweb.com or via Twitter @arobinson_Trib.

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