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Heinz Endowments funds drilling foes and backers

| Sunday, June 2, 2013, 1:39 p.m.

In the fierce debate over the safety of fracking for natural gas, one group is giving both sides a chance to make their points.

The Heinz Endowments, Downtown, is funding groups that say hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, can't be done safely. But it is working with major energy companies and environmentalists who believe the drilling can be done without hurting the environment or public health.

“The Endowments actually tries to encourage the democratic principle of airing various (and sometimes opposing) points of view on complicated and important issues,” Heinz spokesman Doug Root wrote in an email. That includes funding “different approaches to advocacy on environmental issues” because at any point in time one approach may be more effective than another.

Heinz does not have a problem with the diverse views, but during the past two months, dozens of environmental groups have criticized a new initiative the Endowments helped found — the Downtown-based Center for Sustainable Shale Development. That's a partnership between energy companies, including Shell and Chevron, and national and regional environmental groups.

In announcing the effort, Heinz Endowments President Robert Vagt said he believes fracking “can be done in a way that does not do violence to the environment.”

One anti-fracking group that received funding last year from Heinz said it does not approve of the Sustainable Shale effort.

“Yes, we absolutely raised serious concerns” with the Endowments, said Barbara Arrindell, director of Damascus Citizens for Sustainability, a New York-based group. She said she asked Heinz “where you're going with this.”

Arrindell called the Sustainable Shale effort “terribly silly” and a “distraction” from efforts to examine health and environmental impacts from fracking, but said she recognizes the Endowments, like other large organizations, contains people with different views. She said her group “kind of (has) to live with” the situation.

Others note that some criticism of the Sustainable Shale project uses a selective brush, attacking the energy companies and certain environmental groups for working with them — but not the Heinz Endowments.

When some environmental groups issued an open letter criticizing the Sustainable Shale Center in late May, a pro-drilling website noticed the omission.

“We doubt they'll send a nasty-gram to the Heinz Endowments because Heinz funds the very kinds of groups” that criticize drilling, noted the Marcellus Drilling News, an online publication for landowners who support drilling.

Fracking, which involves injecting large volumes of water with sand and hazardous chemicals underground to break apart rock, has made it possible to tap into deep reserves of oil and natural gas but has raised concerns about air and water pollution.

Until Heinz went public with the Sustainable Shale effort this year, the situation seemed far more clear-cut. The Endowments has given out more than $10 million in gas drilling-related grants over the past three years. Many of the grant recipients have criticized the industry.

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