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Pennsylvania politicians react to violence in Charlottesville

Chuck Biedka
| Saturday, Aug. 12, 2017, 6:18 p.m.
The statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee stands behind a crowd of hundreds of white nationalists, neo-Nazis and members of the 'alt-right' during the 'Unite the Right' rally Aug. 12, 2017, in Charlottesville, Va. After clashes with anti-fascist protesters and police the rally was declared an unlawful gathering and people were forced out of Lee Park, where a statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee is slated to be removed.
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The statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee stands behind a crowd of hundreds of white nationalists, neo-Nazis and members of the 'alt-right' during the 'Unite the Right' rally Aug. 12, 2017, in Charlottesville, Va. After clashes with anti-fascist protesters and police the rally was declared an unlawful gathering and people were forced out of Lee Park, where a statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee is slated to be removed.

Members of Pennsylvania's congressional delegation and other politicians took to social media Saturday to roundly condemn the violence and extremism in Charlottesville , Va.

“Our nation must stand together and condemn this racism and those who promote it,” U.S. Sen. Bob Casey posted on Twitter.

“Those marching to promote ‘white nationalism' are promoting a blatantly racist ideology,” the Scranton Democrat tweeted.

U.S. Sen. Pat Toomey, R-Lehigh Valley, tweeted that the “racism, hate and violence seen in Charlottesville are vile and unacceptable.”

A spokeswoman for Toomey said he was not available for further comment. A Casey representative could not be reached.

U.S. Rep. Mike Kelly, R-Butler, added “Amen!” when he retweeted a message from Vice President Mike Pence in support of President Trump.

“I stand with @POTUS against hate & violence,” Pence tweeted. “U.S. is greatest when we join together & oppose those seeking to divide us.”

Trump tweeted: “We ALL must be united & condemn all that hate stands for. There is no place for this kind of violence in America. Lets come together as one!”

U.S. Rep. Tim Murphy, R-Upper St. Clair, in a statement said: “The sickening violence in Charlottesville, Va., was born of racist hate masquerading as political dissent. There is no ‘other side' to racial equality and common decency. The racist extremists who sought and invited this violence should be driven from all venues of public life. Hate is hate, and there is no antidote for it but universal rejection.”

U.S. Rep. Mike Doyle, D-Forest Hills, condemned the “hate, bigotry and racism on display” in Charlottesville.

“It has no place in this country,” he wrote on Twitter.

Gov. Tom Wolf wrote: “Responding to #Charlottesville events in 1 tweet is difficult. But let's be clear: white nationalists are racists and racism is un-American.”

Chuck Biedka is a Tribune-Review staff writer. Reach him at 724-226-4711 or cbiedka@tribweb.com or via Twitter @ChuckBiedka.

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