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History of Pennsylvania state trooper shootings

| Tuesday, Nov. 7, 2017, 10:45 p.m.
Emergency personal respond to a Pennsylvania State Police corporal being shot during a traffic stop Tuesday, Nov. 7, 2017,  in Plainfield Township, Northampton County, Pa., prompting a massive pursuit south to Easton Hospital where police said they apprehended a suspect in the shooting.
Emergency personal respond to a Pennsylvania State Police corporal being shot during a traffic stop Tuesday, Nov. 7, 2017, in Plainfield Township, Northampton County, Pa., prompting a massive pursuit south to Easton Hospital where police said they apprehended a suspect in the shooting.

The shooting of a Pennsylvania state trooper Tuesday in Northampton County is one of several in the last few years.

Police did not release the name of the corporal who was shot, but said he was flown from the scene to St. Luke's University Hospital in Fountain Hill, where he is undergoing treatment for multiple gunshot wounds, according to state police.

Though this list includes fatal shootings, the corporal who was shot Tuesday is alive and undergoing treatment for multiple gunshot wounds, state police said.

• Dec. 30, 2016: Trooper Landon Weaver responded to a domestic disturbance at a rural home in Huntington County when he was shot by a suspect who had been released on bail on a felony charge earlier in the month. Other troopers found the suspect the next morning, then shot and killed him when he reached for his weapon.

• Sept. 30, 2014: During a training exercise at the Montgomery County Public Safety Training Complex in Plymouth Township, a live round was discharged and struck Trooper David Kedra in the chest. He was flown to Temple University Hospital and died of his injury. State police ruled his killing accidental, and firearms instructor Richard Schroeter pleaded guilty to reckless endangerment.

• Sept. 12, 2014: Corporal Brian Dickson was killed during an ambush-style shooting of the Blooming Grove barracks in Pike County. Police captured the shooter, Eric Frein, using Dickson's handcuffs after a seven-week manhunt — one of the most intense in Pennsylvania's history. Frein was convicted of all 12 charges, including capital murder of a law enforcement officer, and in April a jury sentenced him to death.

• Jan. 13, 2010: Trooper Paul Richey was shot outside a home in Venango County, where he responded to a domestic disturbance. The man then murdered his wife and committed suicide. Richey was pronounced dead at a hospital in Seneca, Venango County.

• June 7, 2009: Trooper Joshua Miller was killed while trying to apprehend a man wanted for a kidnapping in Nazareth. The gunman led police on a 40-mile chase into Monroe County, where he opened fire, killing Miller and wounding another trooper.

• Dec. 12, 2005: After a short pursuit off an exit ramp of Interstate 376 in Carnegie, Allegheny County, resulting in a violent struggle with the driver of the vehicle in pursuit, Corporal Joseph Pokorny was shot and killed with his own service weapon. The suspect fled the scene with the weapon but was taken into custody later in the day and officially charged with Pokorny's death two days later.

• Nov. 9, 2002: Trooper Joseph Sepp joined local officers in the vehicle pursuit of a man suspected of drunk driving in Summerhill, Cambria County. The suspect crashed into a utility pole, exited the car and stated shooting, striking Sepp in the head. He died the next day of his injuries. The suspect was convicted of first-degree murder on December 10, 2003.

• Feb. 3, 1985: Trooper Gary Fisher and his partner were conducting an undercover drug buy in Westmoreland County when, during a struggle with one of the suspects, he dropped his service weapon and the gun discharged as the suspect picked it up. Thus, the homicide charges against the shooter were dropped.

• June 13, 1979: During a narcotics raid on a home in New Castle, Lawrence County, Trooper Albert Izzo was shot and killed in an exchange of gunfire. The shooter was convicted of first degree murder and sentenced to life in prison.

• Sept. 13, 1977: Trooper Joseph Welsch was attempting to serve a warrant on a man in Tioga County when the man pulled out a gun and killed him. The suspect was convicted of first degree murder and sentenced to life in prison.

Information found in this list is from The Morning Call archives and the Officer Down Memorial Page.

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