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Mother recalls Dubois Marine killed in Nevada blast

| Wednesday, March 20, 2013, 1:42 p.m.

DUBOIS — The mother of a young man from Dubois who was killed by an explosion during a training exercise said he wanted to be a Marine since he was a young boy.

Karen Perry met Wednesday with the Marine Corps to plan funeral arrangements for Pfc. Josh Martino, 19, a native of Dubois.

"Since he was probably 8 years old he wanted to be a Marine," she said. "That's all he wanted to do."

She first heard a radio news report about the Monday accident at Hawthorne Army Depot in Nevada, then three Marines showed up at her workplace on Tuesday to say he was one of the seven who were killed. Eight Marines were injured.

Josh Martino, known as Tino to his friends, played football and ran track at Dubois Area Senior High School, liked to snowboard and was an avid hunter.

"If anybody reads any of his Facebook comments, which there's hundreds of them being posted, he loved to talk," Perry said. "He always got himself into trouble for that."

She said Martino, stationed at Camp Lejeune, N.C., was in Nevada for training in preparation for being shipped out to Afghanistan. He hoped to marry his fiancee later this year, before the deployment. He had joined the Marine Corps in July.

Their last communication was Sunday, by text message, just about "things in general, what they were doing," Perry said.

"Things had been a little rough out there when they were up in the mountains for a couple weeks," she said.

Investigators are trying to figure out why a mortar shell exploded in its firing tube at an ammunition depot, sending out the shrapnel that killed and injured the Marines.

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