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Harrisburg's Bishop McFadden dies at 65

| Thursday, May 2, 2013, 11:18 a.m.
This June 22, 2010 file photo, Monsignor Joseph P. McFadden speaks during a news conference in Harrisburg, Pa. Bishop Joseph McFadden, who led the Roman Catholic diocese of Harrisburg for the past three years, died unexpectedly in Philadelphia, Thursday, May 2, 2013 after feeling ill, church officials said. He had been attending a meeting of the Catholic Bishops of Pennsylvania. He was 65.
This June 8, 2004 file photo shows Monsignor Joseph P. McFadden in Philadelphia. Church officials say Bishop Joseph McFadden died unexpectedly Thursday morning, May 2, 2013 at a hospital in Philadelphia. He had been attending a meeting of the Catholic Bishops of Pennsylvania. He was 65 years old.

PHILADELPHIA — Bishop Joseph McFadden, who led the Roman Catholic diocese of Harrisburg for the past three years, died unexpectedly Thursday after feeling ill, church officials said. He was 65.

McFadden had been in his native Philadelphia attending a meeting of the Catholic Bishops of Pennsylvania. Officials said he awoke feeling ill and was taken to a hospital, where he was pronounced dead. A cause of death has not yet been announced.

McFadden was appointed the 10th bishop of Harrisburg in June 2010 and installed two months later. The diocese serves about 250,000 Catholics in 15 counties in central Pennsylvania.

Philadelphia Archbishop Charles Chaput expressed shock and sadness in a statement released Thursday morning. He praised McFadden for his dedication to the church and for using “new forms of media to proclaim the message of the Gospel.”

“His service in our state capital was instrumental in fostering the teachings of the church in the public square,” Chaput said.

McFadden was born in Philadelphia on May 22, 1947, and grew up there with his parents, brother and two sisters. He attended Catholic schools and later graduated from Saint Joseph's University in the city.

McFadden entered the seminary in 1976 and was ordained a priest in 1981. The following year, he was appointed administrative secretary to Philadelphia Cardinal John Krol, a position he held until 1993. During that time, he was named an honorary prelate to Pope John Paul II, with the title of monsignor.

He was named by Philadelphia Cardinal Anthony Bevilacqua as the first president of Cardinal O'Hara High School in Springfield in 1993. Eight years later, he became pastor of St. Joseph Parish in Downingtown, where he served until being named auxiliary bishop of Philadelphia in 2004.

Diocesan officials in Harrisburg have eight days to elect an administrator who will oversee daily operations until a new bishop is appointed by Pope Francis.

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