TribLIVE

| State

 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

Stevens approved for Pa. Supreme Court vacancy

The Senate confirmed Correale F. Stevens as the newest justice on the state Supreme Court. He has most recently has been president judge of state Superior Court. Stevens will assume the seat held most recently by Joan Orie Melvin, who resigned May 1 after being convicted on charges that she used government employees to help her political campaigns.

Email Newsletters

Click here to sign up for one of our email newsletters.

Daily Photo Galleries

'American Coyotes' Series

Traveling by Jeep, boat and foot, Tribune-Review investigative reporter Carl Prine and photojournalist Justin Merriman covered nearly 2,000 miles over two months along the border with Mexico to report on coyotes — the human traffickers who bring illegal immigrants into the United States. Most are Americans working for money and/or drugs. This series reports how their operations have a major impact on life for residents and the environment along the border — and beyond.

By The Associated Press
Monday, July 1, 2013, 12:01 a.m.
 

HARRISBURG — Pennsylvania's Supreme Court got back up to full strength on Sunday with the unanimous confirmation in the state Senate of Correale Stevens as its newest justice.

The Senate voted 50-0 in favor of Stevens, a former state lawmaker who most recently has been president judge of Superior Court, a state appeals court.

He will assume the seat held most recently by Joan Orie Melvin, who resigned on May 1 as a result of her conviction on charges she used government employees to help her political campaigns.

Stevens, a Republican, returns the court to a 4-to-3 GOP majority. He will serve until January 2016, when a new justice, chosen by voters two months earlier, will assume the office on a permanent basis for a 10-year term.

Stevens, 66, lives in Sugarloaf.

He is a familiar face in Pennsylvania politics and government. His long career in public service also includes time as Luzerne County's district attorney, a county judge and seven years as a state representative.

In 2011, he began a five-year term as president judge of the Superior Court after being chosen by his fellow judges.

During his Senate Judiciary Committee review, Steven said he would work hard to build consensus on the court.

“It is not in my nature to sit idly by so that someday I can say I was on the Supreme Court,” he told the committee. “No. Rather, if confirmed , I intend to be an active participant on the court. I know and respect the sitting six Supreme Court justices and will seek consensus without giving up principle.”

Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.

 

 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read Pennsylvania

  1. Medical pot has advocate in Pennsylvania House
  2. Teen could spend 10 years in prison for role in injuring Ohio teacher
  3. Boy youngest to receive double-hand transplant in Philadelphia
  4. Fight for equal access continues 25 years after ADA signed
  5. Wolf critic: Public being misled on projected use of shale tax money
  6. Transportation Chief: 5 Airlines probed for price-gouging
  7. Probe continues in fatal shooting in Sharon hospital parking lot
  8. Technology races ahead of Pennsylvania wiretap law