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Washington native to attend Medal of Honor winners' convention

| Wednesday, Sept. 18, 2013, 12:01 a.m.

Walter “Joe” Marm Jr., the only living Western Pennsylvania native to be awarded the Medal of Honor, will be among the 48 medal recipients gathering in Gettysburg this week for the Congressional Medal of Honor Society's annual convention.

Marm, 71, is a native of Washington. He received his Medal of Honor from President Lyndon Johnson on Dec. 19, 1966, for valor when his platoon came under intense enemy fire during the Vietnam War. He retired from the Army as a colonel in 1995 and resides in Fremont, N.C.

Convention officials said Gettysburg was selected because of its links to the military's top honor, which was established during President Abraham Lincoln's administration.

A number of public events, including some that require tickets, will be held during the five-day convention, including:

Wednesday

• 10 a.m. — A ceremony to place a marker commemorating the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg, which resulted in 63 Medals of Honor being bestowed for valor. Lincoln Square. No tickets required.

Thursday

• 2:30 to 4:30 p.m. — An autograph- signing session featuring Medal of Honor recipients. Wyndham Gettysburg Hotel. Tickets required.

Friday

10 a.m. to noon — Town Hall Forum featuring Medal of Honor recipients, moderated by Fox News journalist Chris Wallace. Gettysburg College campus. Tickets required.

• 7 to 9:30 p.m. — Concert featuring the Marine Corps Band and the West Point Cadet Glee Club. Gettysburg Battlefield, Pennsylvania Monument. Tickets required.

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