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Testimony ends in trial for former Carnegie Mellon University trustee Delgado

| Friday, Oct. 25, 2013, 9:09 p.m.

EL PASO — Testimony ended on Friday in the trial of a West Texas lawyer and former Carnegie Mellon University trustee accused of conspiring to launder drug money, and closing arguments are scheduled for Monday.

Marco Antonio Delgado is accused of devising a scheme to launder up to $600 million for a Mexican drug cartel in 2007 and 2008.

Delgado testified on Thursday and Friday, saying he never knew the funds he handled were illegal. Prosecutors argue that he conspired with Lilian De La Concha, the ex-wife of former Mexican President Vicente Fox Quesada, and others to launder money for the now-disbanded Milenio cartel.

Federal agents had testified that after Delgado was arrested in September 2007 with $1 million, he confessed and agreed to cooperate, but in 2008 he continued moving drug money behind his handlers' backs.

At the time of his arrest in 2012, Delgado had given a $250,000 endowment for a scholarship named after him to assist Hispanic students, according to the Carnegie Mellon University website. He was a regular contributor to the El Paso Symphony Orchestra and a member of a local educational foundation.

De La Concha was in a romantic relationship with Delgado at the time of the money-moving operation, prosecutors said, and phone calls recorded by agents show that she relayed messages back and forth between Delgado and a man known as Chuy, the alleged intermediary between the cartel and Delgado and De La Concha.

Federal agents and Victor Pimentel, a former associate of Delgado who is a government witness, have testified that Delgado told De La Concha that he had cancer in order to break off the relationship after an operation proved unsuccessful. The emails presented on Friday were given to the government by De La Concha through an intermediary, prosecutor Debra Kanof told the court.

Delgado told the court that he does not remember exchanging those emails with De La Concha.

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