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State's lottery director will exit

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Thursday, Nov. 7, 2013, 11:53 p.m.
 

The executive director of the Pennsylvania Lottery is leaving for a private-sector position with a subcontractor of the company the state contracts for lottery services.

Todd Rucci, appointed executive director in September 2011, will stay until Nov. 22. Then he'll take a government and communication relations job with PAP Technologies, a Lancaster-based firm specializing in lottery ticket printing for games such as Powerball and Mega Millions.

The company is a subcontractor of Scientific Games International, which has two contracts with the Department of Revenue to provide instant games and online lottery services. In fiscal year 2012-13, the state paid Scientific Games $62.3 million, according to Revenue Department figures.

Mike Robinson, founder and president of PAP Technologies, said he hired Rucci because of “his contacts, his relationships, his knowledge and his reputation” at a time when the company wants to break into more casino services and printing.

“It was just a good fit,” Robinson said. “He knows the industry and can help us on a national, state and local level with his relationships and knowledge.”

Rucci, paid $136,294 annually as lottery director, lives in Lancaster County. He said in a statement that he learned from the lottery's 200-plus employees and found their commitment to the job inspiring.

He departs at a time when the lottery's day-to-day operations could privatize under a proposed $34 million deal with Camelot Global Services, a British company.

State contract documents dated May 2012, signed by Rucci, show Scientific Games would continue to be a state contractor under a private management agreement.

With Camelot, the state would retain ownership and control of the Pennsylvania Lottery. An executive director position would exist, said Elizabeth Brassell, a Revenue spokeswoman.

“He was participating in the process,” Brassell said of Rucci. “But this decision doesn't have any impact on the (management agreement).”

She said Rucci is leaving for several reasons, including wanting a job closer to home.

“There is no one reason he decided to move on,” Brassell said.

Robert Coyne, deputy secretary in the Revenue Department, will become interim director. Brassell said Coyne, paid $130,641 annually, will hold both positions.

Last week, Gov. Tom Corbett said he would extend Camelot's bid until Dec. 31. Finalizing the agreement stalled in February when Attorney General Kathleen Kane, whose office must review state contracts, said the deal needs legislative approval.

Lottery profits support Department of Aging programs for senior citizens, such as property tax rebate and prescription drug programs. In fiscal year 2012-13, the lottery brought in $3.69 billion in sales, resulting in more than $1 billion in net revenue to go toward senior programs.

The state expects Camelot could generate $3 billion to $4.5 billion in new revenue during the 20-year contract term.

Melissa Daniels is a Trib Total Media staff writer. Reach her at 412-380-8511 or mdaniels@tribweb.com.

 

 

 
 


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