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Corbett ready for 2nd half as governor

| Saturday, Feb. 1, 2014, 5:54 p.m.
Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Corbett, left, greets supporters from the state GOP Winter Meeting after accepting their endorsement for another term as governor, at the Hershey Lodge and Convention Center in Hershey Pa., Saturday, Feb. 1, 2014. (AP Photo/Chris Knight)
Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Corbett, speaks to the state GOP Winter Meeting and accepts their endorsement for another term as governor on Saturday, Feb. 1, 2014, at the Hershey Lodge and Convention Center in Hershey.

HERSHEY — Gov. Tom Corbett compared this year's gubernatorial campaign with halftime during a football game on Saturday as he accepted the Republican State Committee's unanimous endorsement for a second four-year term.

“We're going to score and score and score in the second half,” Corbett promised the party faithful, who cheered in the Hershey Lodge as rock music blared and hundreds of red, white and blue balloons were released from the ceiling high above.

In his speech, Corbett portrayed his first term as a combination of bitter medicine in the form of austerity measures that erased a multibillion-dollar budget shortfall he had inherited, and smart policies that have eliminated inheritance taxes on farmers and small businesses, reduced unemployment and pumped billions of dollars into highway and bridge projects.

“We came up with a game plan, and you don't change the game plan at halftime,” he said.

Corbett responded to Democratic critics who blame his nearly $1 billion reduction in education spending in 2011 for the layoffs of thousands of local school employees. He reiterated that much of the spending was supported by federal stimulus money that expired at the end of that fiscal year.

“It was not coming back and they knew it,” he said of the administration of predecessor Gov. Ed Rendell, a Democrat.

Eight Democrats are competing for their party's nomination to challenge Corbett in November.

Corbett, who is struggling to overcome weak job approval ratings and placate conservatives who complain that he is not sensitive to their concerns, said he viewed his election victory in 2010 as a mandate to make tough fiscal decisions and rein in unnecessary spending.

“That's exactly what you nominated me for and the people of Pennsylvania elected me to do. And I can tell you this, I kept my promise,” he said.

Lt. Gov. Jim Cawley, who was endorsed for re-election, warned that this year's gubernatorial campaign will require “an extra special effort” and promised a strong grass-roots-based approach.

“Make no mistake, my friends, we are in a war. It is war of ideas. It is a war for truth. It is a war for the future of our commonwealth, and we need to build a corps of Corbett captains” to fight it, he said.

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