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USS Somerset arrives in Philadelphia for commissioning

| Friday, Feb. 21, 2014, 2:57 p.m.
Steph Chambers | Tribune-Review
Natasha Ward of New York City and Miles Amburgey of Longview, Wash., straighten name decals on Thursday aboard the USS Somerset at Penn’s Landing in Philadelphia. The ship is named after the county where United Airlines Flight 93 crashed when passengers thwarted hijackers’ plans.
Steph Chambers | Tribune-Review
A vibrant 'Never Forget' reminder has a prominent spot on the USS Somerset.
Steph Chambers | Tribune-Review
Natasha Ward of New York City and Miles Amburgey of Longview, Wash., straighten name decals on Thursday, Feb. 27, 2014, aboard the USS Somerset at Penn’s Landing in Philadelphia. The ship is named after the county where United Airlines Flight 93 crashed when passengers thwarted hijackers’ plans.
Steph Chambers | Tribune-Review
The USS Somerset’s living quarters will house 400 crew members, many of whom were in junior high school or younger when terrorists struck on Sept. 11, 2001.
Steph Chambers | Tribune-Review
The USS Somerset, at Penn’s Landing in Philadelphia, will be commissioned in a formal ceremony on Saturday morning. The ship can launch Ch-46 helicopters, MV-22 Osprey and assault watercraft to bring 1,200 troops ashore.
Steph Chambers | Tribune-Review
Markers and mementos throughout the ship tell the story of Somerset County and the heroes of United Flight 93. Hallways are marked with green and white signs from each of the county’s 50 municipalities.
Steph Chambers | Tribune-Review
The USS Somerset is the ninth San Antonio-class amphibious transport dock and honors the 40 passengers and crew members aboard Flight 93, which crashed in Stonycreek.
Steph Chambers | Tribune-Review
Markers and mementos throughout the ship tell the story of Somerset County and the heroes of United Flight 93. Hallways are marked with green and white signs from each of the county’s 50 municipalities.
Steph Chambers | Tribune-Review
The USS Somerset is the ninth San Antonio-class amphibious transport dock and honors the 40 passengers and crew members aboard Flight 93, which crashed in Stonycreek Township.
Steph Chambers | Tribune-Review
The crew heads into the ship after a routine on Thursday, Feb. 27, 2014, aboard the USS Somerset at Penn's Landing in Philadelphia. The USS Somerset is the ninth San Antonio-class amphibious transport dock and honors the 40 passengers and crew members aboard Flight 93, which crashed in Stonycreek.
Steph Chambers | Tribune-Review
The USS Somerset is the ninth San Antonio-class amphibious transport dock and honors the 40 passengers and crew members aboard Flight 93, which crashed in Stonycreek.
Steph Chambers | Tribune-Review
Two crew members high-five upon completing a routine on Thursday, Feb. 27, 2014, aboard the USS Somerset at Penn's Landing in Philadelphia.
Steph Chambers | Tribune-Review
Media members take photographs during a tour on Thursday, Feb. 27, 2014, aboard the USS Somerset at Penn's Landing in Philadelphia. The USS Somerset is the ninth San Antonio-class amphibious transport dock and honors the 40 passengers and crew members aboard Flight 93, which crashed in Stonycreek.
Steph Chambers | Tribune-Review
A crew member walks past a list of names decaled on a metal beam on Thursday, Feb. 27, 2014, aboard the USS Somerset at Penn's Landing in Philadelphia. The USS Somerset is the ninth San Antonio-class amphibious transport dock and honors the 40 passengers and crew members aboard Flight 93, which crashed in Stonycreek on 9/11.
Steph Chambers | Tribune-Review
People gather near a handmade quilt contributed by family members on Thursday, Feb. 27, 2014, aboard the USS Somerset at Penn's Landing in Philadelphia.
Steph Chambers | Tribune-Review
Capt. Thomas L. Dearborn speaks to the media on Thursday, Feb. 27, 2014, aboard the USS Somerset at Penn's Landing in Philadelphia.
Steph Chambers | Tribune-Review
Kagen Huebner of San Diego describes his work behind hanging decorations on Thursday, Feb. 27, 2014, aboard the USS Somerset at Penn's Landing in Philadelphia.
Steph Chambers | Tribune-Review
A crew member gives a thumbs up after landing an MV-22 Osprey aircraft on Thursday, Feb. 27, 2014, aboard the USS Somerset at Penn's Landing in Philadelphia.

PHILADELPHIA — A Navy ship named for a 9/11 attack site has arrived in Philadelphia for its commissioning ceremony.

The USS Somerset moved up the Delaware River on Friday. It's christened for the Pennsylvania county where a hijacked airliner crashed after passengers stormed the cockpit.

The amphibious transport dock is the last of three vessels honoring 9/11 victims and first responders. It joins the USS New York and the USS Arlington.

The USS Somerset will be open for public tours beginning next week. The private commissioning ceremony, which officially places a ship into service, is scheduled for March 1.

The $1.2 billion vessel will then head to its home port in San Diego. It's designed to launch helicopters, tilt-rotor aircraft and assault watercraft.

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