Share This Page

Lawrence County cops dress as Amish to target flasher

| Tuesday, April 15, 2014, 8:15 a.m.

A male police officer spent much of December and January dressed as an Amish woman in hopes of scaring off a man suspected of exposing himself to Amish children in Lawrence County.

Pulaski Township Sgt. Chad Adams said Tuesday that police weren't able to charge the man because of a lack of evidence, but they believe he's the same person sentenced to house arrest in January for similar incidents in neighboring Mercer County. That's because the incidents in Pulaski also stopped around the same time.

Still, Adams felt it was important to publicize his undercover gig on the police department's Facebook page, if only to deter the suspect or others in the future.

“Sometimes being a police officer means going undercover and doing what you have to do to catch the bad guy,” Adams wrote in a caption for a photo showing him in a blue dress, black cloak and bonnet.

Adams was assisted by a female officer from nearby Wampum, who also dressed in Amish garb.

The Amish didn't want their children to testify in court and agreed to lend police the women's bonnets, aprons and dresses to catch or scare away the suspect.

Adams said the Amish were “not at all” concerned about his cross-dressing methods, despite their conservative beliefs.

“I wondered that myself, but I asked and they were all for it,” the sergeant said. “They didn't want this man around here, they didn't want this to continue.”

Adams said the suspect, whose car was seen in the area but who was never caught in the act of exposing himself in his township, is due to be released from house arrest soon.

“I figured if I put this out there, maybe it would deter him or others from even considering doing this in the future,” Adams said.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.