TribLIVE

| USWorld

 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

Panetta says Karzai should thank allied forces

Email Newsletters

Click here to sign up for one of our email newsletters.

Daily Photo Galleries

'American Coyotes' Series

Traveling by Jeep, boat and foot, Tribune-Review investigative reporter Carl Prine and photojournalist Justin Merriman covered nearly 2,000 miles over two months along the border with Mexico to report on coyotes — the human traffickers who bring illegal immigrants into the United States. Most are Americans working for money and/or drugs. This series reports how their operations have a major impact on life for residents and the environment along the border — and beyond.

By The Associated Press
Friday, Oct. 5, 2012, 9:38 p.m.
 

Defense Secretary Leon Panetta lashed back at Afghan President Hamid Karzai Friday, saying the Afghan leader should say thank you now and then to the allied forces who are fighting and dying there, rather than criticizing them.

Panetta was responding to Karzai's complaints on Thursday that the United States is failing to go after militants based in Pakistan, and instead is concentrating on insurgents in Afghanistan.

“We have made progress in Afghanistan because there are men and women in uniform who have been willing to fight and die for Afghanistan's sovereignty,” Panetta snapped, as he spoke with reporters traveling with him to South America. “Those lives were lost fighting the right enemy not the wrong enemy, and I think it would be helpful if the president, every once in a while, expressed his thanks for the sacrifices that have been made by those who have fought and died for Afghanistan, rather than criticizing them.”

The uncharacteristic shot from Panetta occurs as tensions between the two countries have escalated over the increase in insider attacks, where Afghan security forces or insurgents dressed in their uniforms have turned their guns on coalition troops. And it raises the temperature on the heels of the announcement that, as of last weekend, 2,000 U.S. troops had lost their lives in the war.

At the same time, however, there is persistent frustration with the insurgents, including members of the Haqqani network, who wage attacks against coalition forces in Afghanistan and can then retreat to their safe havens in Pakistan. U.S. officials have repeatedly pressed Islamabad to more forcefully go after the insurgents, including Haqqani factions in and around North Waziristan.

Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.

 

 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read Stories

  1. Rossi: Looking at the next great Steeler
  2. After early criticism, Haley has Steelers offense poised to be even better
  3. McCullers’, McLendon’s prowess in clogging trenches crucial to Steelers defense
  4. Penguins not alone in top-heavy approach to salary cap
  5. Roman Catholic Church in midst of culture clash over gays
  6. Reds solve Cole, stave off Pirates’ 9th-inning rally
  7. Steelers swap draft pick for Eagles cornerback
  8. High school notebook: Baseball standouts showcase their skills for pro scouts
  9. Starting 9: Examining Pirates’ deadline decisions
  10. Steelers notebook: Injuries finally become issue at training camp
  11. Pirates notebook: New acquisition Happ more than happy to fill spot in rotation