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Taliban victim, 14, changes hospitals

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By Reuters
Thursday, Oct. 11, 2012, 9:21 p.m.
 

PESHAWAR, Pakistan — A Pakistani schoolgirl fighting for her life upon being shot by the Taliban for campaigning for education rights and speaking out against the militants was transferred on Thursday from a hospital in a province that is a militant haven to a specialist hospital in the army garrison town of Rawalpindi.

Malala Yousufzai, 14, was unconscious in critical condition because gunmen shot her in the head and neck as she left school on Tuesday, but doctors said she had moved her arms and legs slightly the night before.

Pakistani surgeons removed a bullet on Wednesday from Yousufzai.

Her courage made her a national hero.

The shooting has drawn condemnation from world leaders and many Pakistanis.

Yousufzai began standing up to the Pakistani Taliban when she was 11, when the government had effectively ceded control of the Swat Valley, where she lives, to the Taliban.

Her father, Ziauddin Yousufzai, who runs a girls' school, said his daughter had defied threats for years, believing the good work she was doing for her community was her best protection.

A Reuters correspondent watched as she was moved from an army hospital in the regional capital of Peshawar to the Armed Forces Institute of Cardiology in Rawalpindi to help her treatment.

“Pray for her,” her distraught uncle, Faiz Mohammad, said before the ambulance left the hospital.

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