TribLIVE

| USWorld

 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

Number powerless finally dips below 1 million

Email Newsletters

Click here to sign up for one of our email newsletters.

Daily Photo Galleries

'American Coyotes' Series

Traveling by Jeep, boat and foot, Tribune-Review investigative reporter Carl Prine and photojournalist Justin Merriman covered nearly 2,000 miles over two months along the border with Mexico to report on coyotes — the human traffickers who bring illegal immigrants into the United States. Most are Americans working for money and/or drugs. This series reports how their operations have a major impact on life for residents and the environment along the border — and beyond.

By Reuters
Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012, 8:54 p.m.
 

NEW YORK — Homes and businesses along the East Coast continued to face power outages on Tuesday caused by damage from Sandy, but the number of outages had dropped below 1 million for the first time since the storm hit more than a week ago.

Sandy's wind and storm surge toppled power lines and flooded areas that held generating equipment, knocking power out to more than 8 million at its peak.

About 930,000 homes and businesses remained without power as of Tuesday afternoon, the Department of Energy said in a report.

Nearly 350,000 customers in New York had no power as of 2 p.m. on Tuesday, government data showed, after peak outages of 2 million.

New Jersey remained the hardest-hit state, with more than a half million homes and businesses with no power, down from a peak of 2.6 million.

Public Service Enterprise Group Inc, the largest electric utility by customer base in New Jersey, said on Tuesday that 226,900 customers remained without power, down from a peak of 1.7 million. The company expects to have power restored to those customers by Friday, a spokeswoman said.

New York power company Consolidated Edison said it had 107,000 customers without electricity, out of 990,000 affected by the superstorm. About 20,000 of those customers cannot be reconnected to system until their electrical equipment is inspected, said John Miksad, senior vice president of electric operations for Con Ed.

Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.

 

 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read Stories

  1. Student ‘geek squad’ to help train Steel Valley classmates on iPads
  2. Road, entrance may ease traffic, Dayton Fair officials say
  3. Steelers’ Harrison awaits go-ahead from Tomlin before practicing
  4. One Direction brings the thrills to Heinz Field audience
  5. 4 ejections, benches-clearing scrum mark Pirates’ win over Reds
  6. Law enforcement often feels overwhelmed by Mon Valley’s heroin epidemic
  7. Steelers notebook: WR Bryant sidelined after minor procedure on right elbow
  8. Pa. breeding ground for corruption, experts say
  9. Inside the Steelers: Roethlisberger strong in goal-line drills
  10. Slot cornerback Boykin should give Steelers options in secondary
  11. Inaugural Geibel STEM camp gives pupils interactive, fun science experience