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Egypt's leader imposes curfew

| Sunday, Jan. 27, 2013, 11:41 p.m.
Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review
A young demonstrators sits near ongoing clash with security forces and protesters near the Qasr el Nil bridge in Cairo on Monday. Across Egypt, violence continued for a fourth straight day leaving the number of dead and injured to rise. Monday marks the second anniversary of the 'Day of Rage,' an historic day in the Egyptian revolution. Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review
Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review
A demonstrators stands in the crowd with goggles and a mask as security forces fire teargas onto protesters during a clash near the Qasr el Nil bridge in Cairo on Monday. Across Egypt, violence continued for a fourth straight day leaving the number of dead and injured to rise. Monday marks the second anniversary of the 'Day of Rage,' an historic day in the Egyptian revolution. Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review
Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review
A demonstrator stands in the middle of a road where protesters clash with security forces near the Qasr el Nil bridge in Cairo on Monday. Across Egypt, protesters clashed with security forces for a forth straight day, leaving the number of injured and killed to rise. Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review
Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review
A man covers his mouth to avoid the thick cloud of teargas from clashing protesters and security forces near the Qasr el Nil bridge in Cairo on Monday. Across Egypt, protesters clashed with security forces for a forth straight day, leaving the number of injured and killed to rise. Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review
Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review
A young boy holds empty shells and teargas canisters near a clash with protesters and security forces near the Qasr el Nil bridge in Cairo on Monday. Across Egypt, protesters clashed with security forces for a forth straight day, leaving the number of injured and killed to rise. Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review
Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review
Demonstrators carry an injured protester from a clash with security forces near the Qasr el Nil bridge in Cairo on Monday. Across Egypt, protesters clashed with security forces for a forth straight day, leaving the number of injured and killed to rise. Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review
Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review
A demonstrator chants during a protest on the Qasr el Nil bridge in Cairo on Monday, the second anniversary of the 'Day of Rage.' Two years ago, the government of now-ousted dictator Hosni Mubarak used massive violence against protesters, who had taken the Qasr el-Nil bridge and Tahrir Square as day four of the 18 days of revolution began in earnest. It was on that day that scores of Egyptians were killed and injured in what was one of the most brutal days leading to the end of the Mubarak era. Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review
Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review
A demonstrator holds up empty teargas canisters during a protest on the Qasr el Nil bridge in Cairo on Monday. Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review
Teargas falls onto protesters in a clash with security forces near the Qasr el Nil bridge in Cairo on Monday. Across Egypt, protesters clashed with security forces for a forth straight day, leaving the number of injured and killed to rise. Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review
Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review
A demonstrator carries a molotov cocktail bomb during a clash with security forces near the Qasr el Nil bridge in Cairo on Monday. Violent clashes with protesters and police continued throughout Egypt, raising the number of dead and injured for a forth straight day. Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review
Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review
A young boy stands in the teargas-filled street as protesters and security forces clash near the Qasr el Nil bridge in Cairo on Monday. Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review
Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review
A man sells bread as people watch from the Qasr el Nil bridge as demonstrators clash with security forces on Monday. Today marks the second anniversary of the 'Day of Rage,' when two years ago, the government of now-ousted dictator Hosni Mubarak used massive violence against protesters, who had taken the Qasr el-Nil bridge and Tahrir Square as day four of the 18 days of revolution began in earnest. It was on that day that scores of Egyptians were killed and injured in what was one of the most brutal days leading to the end of the Mubarak era. Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review
Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review
Young boys hide their eyes from the teargas as protesters clash with security forces near the Qasr el Nil bridge in Cairo on Monday, the second anniversary of the 'Day of Rage.' Two years ago, the government of now-ousted dictator Hosni Mubarak used massive violence against protesters, who had taken the Qasr el-Nil bridge and Tahrir Square as day four of the 18 days of revolution began in earnest. It was on that day that scores of Egyptians were killed and injured in what was one of the most brutal days leading to the end of the Mubarak era. Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review
Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review
Men flee the blowing dust, debris and teargas near the Qasr el Nil bridge in Cairo where protesters gathered and clashed with security forces on Monday. The violence across Egypt continued leaving the number of dead and injured to rise. Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review
Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review
A demonstrator runs with a teargas canister fired onto protesters in a clash with security forces near the Qasr el Nil bridge in Cairo on Monday. Across Egypt, protesters clashed with security forces for a forth straight day, leaving the number of injured and killed to rise. Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review
Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review
A young demonstrators gathers rocks in his sweater during a clash with security forces near the Qasr el Nil bridge in Cairo on Monday, which marks the second anniversary of the 'Day of Rage.' Across Egypt violence continued for a fourth straight day leaving the number of dead and injured to rise. Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review
Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review
A demonstrator runs with a teargas canister fired onto protesters in a clash with security forces near the Qasr el Nil bridge in Cairo on Monday, the second anniversary of the 'Day of Rage.' Two years ago, the government of now-ousted dictator Hosni Mubarak used massive violence against protesters, who had taken the Qasr el-Nil bridge and Tahrir Square as day four of the 18 days of revolution began in earnest. It was on that day that scores of Egyptians were killed and injured in what was one of the most brutal days leading to the end of the Mubarak era. Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review
Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review
A man carries a demonstrator wounded in a clash with security forces near Tahrir Square on Sunday, January 27, 2013. For a third straight day, violence escalated throughout Egypt, leaving the number of injured and dead to mount.
Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review
A demonstrators fixes his goggles as security forces fire teargas onto protesters during a clash near the Qasr el Nil bridge in Cairo on Monday. Across Egypt, violence continued for a fourth straight day leaving the number of dead and injured to rise. Monday marks the second anniversary of the 'Day of Rage,' an historic day in the Egyptian revolution. Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review
Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review
A demonstrator throws a tear gas canister after it was fired on protesters in Tahrir Square on Sunday, Jan. 27, 2012. Across Egypt, demonstrations continued as clashes broke out between security forces and protesters and the number of injured and dead continue to rise. Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review
Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review
Demonstrators protest on the Qasr el Nil bridge in Cairo on Monday, the second anniversary of the 'Day of Rage.' Two years ago, the government of now-ousted dictator Hosni Mubarak used massive violence against protesters, who had taken the Qasr el Nil bridge and scores of Egyptians were killed and injured in what was one of the most brutal days leading to the end of the Mubarak era. Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review
Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review
A demonstrator carries a burning tire towards the front lines of a clash with protesters and security forces near the Qasr el Nil bridge in Cairo on Monday. Fires are created to help alleviate the effects of the teargas. Clashes continued for a forth straight day across Egypt, leaving a rising number of wounded and dead. Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review

CAIRO — Egyptian President Mohamed Morsy declared states of emergency on Sunday in the coastal cities of Port Said, Suez and Ismailia after three days of growing violence.

At least 50 people were reported dead and more than 1,100 injured nationwide.

In a brief address, Morsy said he would deal harshly with those provoking the unrest. Wagging a finger, he said police would enforce a 9 p.m. to 6 a.m. curfew in all three cities.

The emergency declaration restores the much-hated emergency law of deposed President Hosni Mubarak, which gives police the power to detain citizens without charge for 30 days and allows trials in emergency state-security courts.

Tens of thousands of mourners filled streets in Port Said for a funeral for about 30 people killed in rioting on Saturday. They called for Morsy's downfall, chanting he is “the enemy of Allah.”

Gunfire punctuated the funeral procession, and police fired tear gas at protesters.

The violence in Port Said erupted when a court sentenced 21 people to death for their roles in a soccer riot that killed more than 70 people nearly a year ago.

Seven protesters were killed in the city on Sunday, and more than 400 were wounded.

Troops deployed there and in Ismailia on Saturday, as they did Friday in Suez.

In Cairo, protesters battled security forces on streets around Tahrir Square until they were forced back by tear gas.

Protests against Morsy and the ruling Islamic-based Muslim Brotherhood began on Friday, the second anniversary of an uprising that deposed Mubarak.

“I came here to topple the regime and show support for my brothers here,” said a wheezing Mohammed Mansour, 32, who works in a marble shop in the square.

An older woman, her face veiled against the tear gas, cursed Morsy and the Brotherhood. She said Gamal Abdel Nasser, who ruled Egypt from 1956 to 1970, warned about the Brotherhood's “treachery.”

Theresa Samir Moussa, 28, said she had been willing to give Morsy a chance, but now, all trust is gone. She said the ousted Mubarak's crimes “are the same crimes of Morsy.”

“Look how much money they are spending to fight their own people with tear gas, rubber bullets and even live ammunition, when people don't have enough to eat,” she said.

In Tahrir Square, youths banged drums and chanted “Leave, leave!” as they marched on police lobbing tear gas.

One demonstrator said that men throwing rocks at protesters were “the Brotherhood's militia,” but another thought the rock-throwers were plain-clothed police.

At the heart of the conflict and the rising opposition to Morsy is a controversial constitution ratified in December. Morsy's Islamist allies hurriedly drafted it without input from liberals or minority Christians; opponents say it has an Islamist slant and jeopardizes individual freedoms.

Morsy and Brotherhood officials have said they are defending democracy.

“The political crisis has been institutionalized in the constitution,” said Michael Hanna, senior fellow at the New York-based Century Foundation think tank, who is in Cairo. “This is a political crisis with deep roots, and Morsy and the Brotherhood are not amendable to fixes.”

He said that, as the situation deteriorates, Morsy and the Brotherhood are becoming “more insular … and paranoid,” leading them to close ranks “rather than looking for fixes.”

Egypt's collapsing economy, he said, “will further drive the discontent and aggravate the political division. They don't have a firm platform from which to govern.”

Morsy's office offered condolences for the dead and blamed the violence on “counterrevolutionary forces.”

As the curfew went into effect at midnight, Egyptian TV showed a large protest in Suez, with the crowd defiantly chanting: “Morsy is Mubarak.”

Betsy Hiel is the foreign correspondent for Trib Total Media. Email her at bhiel@tribweb.com.

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